NY Subway Murder Suspect Was ‘Having Bad Day’

January 20, 2013
Doesn’t sound like she knows the difference between Hindus and Muslims: A woman accused of murdering a man by pushing him in front of a New York City subway train has said she did it because she was having a bad day. Erika Menendez, 31, has been charged with murdering Sunando Sen, a (Hindu) Indian immigrant, last month.”My mind was just racing that day. I was mad,” she said in an interview with the New York Post. The interview was conducted at the city jail where she is awaiting trial. “I was homeless. I was hungry. I was fighting with my boyfriend. He came running up the stairs, and I just got up and pushed him.” “He was trying to shake me off,” she said. Menendez, from the Bronx, has told detectives she was motivated by hatred of Muslims and Hindus since the September 11, 2001 attacks. In the interview, she said she had picked her victim because of his ethnicity. Mr Sen, 46, was Hindu. Menendez told the newspaper she has “been beating up Muslims and Hindus for a long time”.

I once spent the weekend in jail for that kind of prank when I was younger. #OWS can get away with anything because it’s left wing rage.

March 31, 2012

Image via The Blaze Via Morgan Richmond at Hot Air:  (moon bat track) I’m not sure why, but I was expecting the occupy movement to re-group over the winter and get a little smarter about the types of tactics they are using. At times throughout our history civil disobedience has been used to advance causes which most of us would probably agree were for the betterment of the nation. I’m glad Rosa Parks refused to sit in the back of the bus and it sickens me that she ever had to. But fighting to end racial discrimination and demanding free stuff from a government going deeper and deeper into debt are not exactly morally equivalent, to say the least. And this fact isn’t lost on most Americans, regardless of whether the media continues to gloss over the occupy movement’s most egregious behavior.

Transport Workers Union Local 100 and the Amalgamated Transit Union apparently helped #OWS open up subway exits at about 20 subway stations across the city. They made official looking signs telling people to enter through the gates. The union goons who helped out with the stunt did it because they’re in contract negotiations with the MTA — (which should certainly help with negotiations.)
The Fox 5 News crew was on the scene interviewing subway customers, most of whom were not amused by the juvenile hijinks.


Palestinians Building Invasion Tunnel To Israel?

June 3, 2011

the_Palestinian_Authority_has_announced,
as part of a $1 billion economic development fund,
a plan to construct a subway tunnel between Rafah and Beit Hanoun
read more via propagandistmag.com

North Korean Tunnel


FAT GAZA: The Humanitarian Crisis Myth



Charlotte LRT
Suggestion:
Start with above ground light rail
image via modernegypt.info, lightrailnow.org,
fuckfrance.com
, zioneocon.blogspot.com,
and via
csmonitor.com

Egypt permanently opens Gaza border crossing

Palestina Libre #4




FBI arrests 2 more in NYC subway terrorists

January 8, 2010

Is it me or are these guys increasing their number of attacks since Obama was elected?

NEW YORK – Two men were arrested Friday in the investigation of a suspected bomb plot targeting New York City, a case that has already led to charges against a Denver airport shuttle driver they attended high school with.

The arrests in New York of Adis Medunjanin and Zarein Ahmedzay were part of “an ongoing investigation” by the Joint Terrorism Task Force, according to FBI agent Richard Kolko, who declined to comment further.

There were no immediate details on the charges against the men, according to Kolko and Robert Nardoza, a spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office in Brooklyn.

The men were expected to appear in court later Friday, Nardoza said.

Medunjanin’s attorney, Robert C. Gottlieb, said the FBI seized his client’s passport Thursday. The search warrant indicated the passport was sought as part of an investigation into a conspiracy to use weapons of mass destruction, Gottlieb said.

The airport driver, Najibullah Zazi, has pleaded not guilty to that charge. He is accused of getting al-Qaida training to build homemade bombs to attack New York City.

After Medunjanin’s apartment was searched, he apparently became upset and left in his car. While driving erratically, he called 911 and made threatening comments, according to a law enforcement official who was not authorized to discuss the case and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. Medunjanin got into an accident and was treated at a hospital for minor injuries.

Ahmedzay was arrested overnight while driving a cab in the Greenwich Village area of Manhattan, authorities said.

Federal investigators questioned Medunjanin and Ahmedzay — who lived in the same Queens neighborhood as Zazi — months ago in the terrorism probe. Their photographs were among four shown to Ahmad Wais Afzali, a Queens imam accused of tipping off Zazi that New York police detectives were looking for him, according to Afzali’s attorney.

Gottlieb has said FBI agents seized computers and cell phones from Medunjanin’s apartment last fall but later returned them.

Gottlieb said the FBI confirmed the arrests Friday morning, many hours after they occurred. He said he didn’t know what charges the men faced.

Gottlieb insisted Medunjanin has done nothing wrong and said officials at the Queens hospital told him that authorities took him into custody after he was treated at the hospital.

“They intentionally hid him from his lawyer and his family,” Gottlieb said.

The name of Ahmedzay’s attorney was not on record.

Medunjanin, who is originally from Bosnia, and Ahmedzay, who was born in Afghanistan, are both U.S. citizens. They and Zazi attended Flushing High School in Queens.

Medunjanin also played football at Flushing High and graduated in June from Queens College. Ahmedzay is licensed to drive a taxi in New York City and took the civil service exam to become a firefighter, although his score made him unlikely to get an appointment.

Interviewed by the AP in the fall, Ahmedzay’s brother, Nazir, denied that Ahmedzay had been involved in any plot against the U.S.

Ahmedzay and Medunjanin were first publicly linked to the investigation in September, when investigators raided their homes shortly before Zazi’s arrest.

Authorities have been watching them for months. Gottlieb had previously confirmed that investigators had questioned Medunjanin and taken computers and cell phones from his apartment.

Prosecutors said that Zazi had recently traveled to a terrorist training camp in Pakistan, and that “others” — who have been named — accompanied him on the trip to the country.

A man who answered the phone at Ahmedzay’s apartment Friday morning identifying himself as the suspect’s father said he had just learned of the arrest.

“We saw it on the television this morning,” he said. He said his son works the night shift, driving a cab, and didn’t come home in the morning.

“I don’t know what happened,” he said. He said he didn’t know whether his son knew Zazi or was involved in anything related to terrorism.


FBI arrests 2 more in NYC subway terrorists

January 8, 2010

Is it me or are these guys increasing their number of attacks since Obama was elected?

NEW YORK – Two men were arrested Friday in the investigation of a suspected bomb plot targeting New York City, a case that has already led to charges against a Denver airport shuttle driver they attended high school with.

The arrests in New York of Adis Medunjanin and Zarein Ahmedzay were part of “an ongoing investigation” by the Joint Terrorism Task Force, according to FBI agent Richard Kolko, who declined to comment further.
There were no immediate details on the charges against the men, according to Kolko and Robert Nardoza, a spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office in Brooklyn.
The men were expected to appear in court later Friday, Nardoza said.
Medunjanin’s attorney, Robert C. Gottlieb, said the FBI seized his client’s passport Thursday. The search warrant indicated the passport was sought as part of an investigation into a conspiracy to use weapons of mass destruction, Gottlieb said.
The airport driver, Najibullah Zazi, has pleaded not guilty to that charge. He is accused of getting al-Qaida training to build homemade bombs to attack New York City.
After Medunjanin’s apartment was searched, he apparently became upset and left in his car. While driving erratically, he called 911 and made threatening comments, according to a law enforcement official who was not authorized to discuss the case and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. Medunjanin got into an accident and was treated at a hospital for minor injuries.
Ahmedzay was arrested overnight while driving a cab in the Greenwich Village area of Manhattan, authorities said.
Federal investigators questioned Medunjanin and Ahmedzay — who lived in the same Queens neighborhood as Zazi — months ago in the terrorism probe. Their photographs were among four shown to Ahmad Wais Afzali, a Queens imam accused of tipping off Zazi that New York police detectives were looking for him, according to Afzali’s attorney.
Gottlieb has said FBI agents seized computers and cell phones from Medunjanin’s apartment last fall but later returned them.
Gottlieb said the FBI confirmed the arrests Friday morning, many hours after they occurred. He said he didn’t know what charges the men faced.
Gottlieb insisted Medunjanin has done nothing wrong and said officials at the Queens hospital told him that authorities took him into custody after he was treated at the hospital.
“They intentionally hid him from his lawyer and his family,” Gottlieb said.
The name of Ahmedzay’s attorney was not on record.
Medunjanin, who is originally from Bosnia, and Ahmedzay, who was born in Afghanistan, are both U.S. citizens. They and Zazi attended Flushing High School in Queens.
Medunjanin also played football at Flushing High and graduated in June from Queens College. Ahmedzay is licensed to drive a taxi in New York City and took the civil service exam to become a firefighter, although his score made him unlikely to get an appointment.
Interviewed by the AP in the fall, Ahmedzay’s brother, Nazir, denied that Ahmedzay had been involved in any plot against the U.S.
Ahmedzay and Medunjanin were first publicly linked to the investigation in September, when investigators raided their homes shortly before Zazi’s arrest.

Authorities have been watching them for months. Gottlieb had previously confirmed that investigators had questioned Medunjanin and taken computers and cell phones from his apartment.

Prosecutors said that Zazi had recently traveled to a terrorist training camp in Pakistan, and that “others” — who have been named — accompanied him on the trip to the country.

A man who answered the phone at Ahmedzay’s apartment Friday morning identifying himself as the suspect’s father said he had just learned of the arrest.

“We saw it on the television this morning,” he said. He said his son works the night shift, driving a cab, and didn’t come home in the morning.

“I don’t know what happened,” he said. He said he didn’t know whether his son knew Zazi or was involved in anything related to terrorism.