Genius! NYC Leaves Marathon Generators in Central Park, Residents Lash Out at Bloomberg

November 5, 2012
That Mike Bloomberg is looking more presidential by the day, huh?

What a run-around!
The city left more than a dozen generators desperately needed by cold and hungry New Yorkers who lost their homes to Hurricane Sandy still stranded in Central Park yesterday.
And that’s not all — stashed near the finish line of the canceled marathon were 20 heaters, tens of thousands of Mylar “space” blankets, jackets, 106 crates of apples and peanuts, at least 14 pallets of bottled water and 22 five-gallon jugs of water.
This while people who lost their homes in the Rockaways, Coney Island and Staten Island were freezing and going hungry.
Michael Murphy, of Staten Island, who had no power and no heat, said yesterday, “We needed 100 percent of the resources here.”
“If those generators were here, we maybe could have had some light for the cleanup effort,” he said. “Those generators would really have come in handy.’’
Larry Gold, 61, of Rockaway Park, who has difficulty breathing, can’t use his oxygen tank without electricity.
“I need power to breathe,’’ he said.

Breathing, it’s really overrated, especially when a blowhard like Bloomberg needs so much oxygen.
Meanwhile, the beloved mayor braved the elements to visit some New Yorkers, where he was warmly greeted.

ok, it’s horrible, and I’m not in love with Islam enabling Bloomberg, but this is not really his fault. I’m reposting it however


‘Trillions of dollars worth of stock certificates and other paper securities that were stored in a vault in lower Manhattan may have suffered water damage’.

November 4, 2012


‘Trillions of dollars worth of stock certificates and other paper securities that were stored in a vault in lower Manhattan may have suffered water damage’.(CNN).Trillions of dollars worth of stock certificates and other paper securities that were stored in a vault in lower Manhattan may have suffered water damage from Superstorm Sandy. The Depository Trust and Clearing Corp., an industry-run clearing house for Wall Street, said the contents of its vault “are likely damaged,” after its building at 55 Water Street “sustained significant water damage” from the storm that battered New York City’s financial district earlier this week. 
The vault contains certificates registered to Cede and Co., a subsidiary of DTCC, as well as “custody certificates” in sealed envelopes that belong to clients. The DTCC provides “custody and asset servicing” for more than 3.6 million securities worth an estimated $36.5 trillion, according to its website. “At this point, it is premature to make an accurate assessment as to the full impact of the water damage nor would it be helpful to project on what specific actions need to be taken with respect to our vault,” said DTCC Chief Executive Michael Bodson in a statement. “We are aggressively working on this situation to minimize disruption to our clients and will provide additional updates as more information becomes available.” Bodson said the DTCC’s computer records are intact and that the corporation has “detailed inventory files of the contents of the vault.”Hmmmm…….Ink and water mix very well.Read the full story here.

might want to rethink paper and its use in the financial market


Taking Advantage of Storm, Thugs Beat, Rob Jewish Man in Brooklyn (GRAPHIC VIDEO)

October 31, 2012

A video has surfaced showing a Jewish man being ambushed, robbed and beaten by African-American thugs during the storm last night in Brooklyn.
In the video, published by local blog Crownheights.info, an assailant strikes the man in the face as he walks past, knocking him to the ground. His accomplices quickly join him, striking the man violently and stripping his pockets. An assailant brutally steps on the man’s head, as he is leaving.
Moments later another passerby is seen attending to the victim who is left sprawled on the floor appearing to be unconscious.
According to Crownheights.info the incident took place on the corner of Albany Avenue and President Street in the Crown Heights area of Brooklyn.