Nokia backs 3DPrinting for mobile phone cases

January 20, 2013

Nokia Lumia phonesThe design files will let people produce their own cases for their Lumia 820

(I can’t wait to have a cellular phone connected to my 3D printed gun! Give the world a serial killer reality show)

Nokia is releasing design files that will let owners use 3D printers to make their own cases for its Lumia phones Files containing mechanical drawings, case measurements and recommended materials have already been released by the phone maker. Those using the files will be able to create a custom-designed case for the flagship Lumia 820 handset. The project makes Nokia one of the first big electronics firms to seriously back 3D printing. In a blogpost, John Kneeland, one of Nokia’s community managers, revealed the Finnish phone maker’s decision to release the 3D drawings. Printing in 3D involves sending a design file to a printer that then forms a solid version of that object by slowly building it up in layers of plastic. Early 3D printers could only work in one colour but the latest versions can produce intricate, multicoloured objects. Industrial sequel Mr Kneeland said Nokia was releasing what he called a “3D printing development kit” to help people produce the cases. The files are already available on the site Nokia maintains for its developers. He said 3D printing was another way that the firm wanted to build links to that vast community of software and hardware engineers. To get the files, users must have registered with Nokia. He said Nokia already used 3D printing internally to do rapid prototyping, but decided to back it more publicly to help the nascent technology realise its “incredible potential”. In the future, he said, 3D printing was likely to bring about phones that were “wildly more modular and customisable”. Nokia might just end up selling a phone template, he said, allowing entrepreneurs to use that to produce handsets that satisfy the particular needs of their locale. “You want a waterproof, glow-in-the-dark phone with a bottle-opener and a solar charger? Someone can build it for you – or you can print it yourself,” he wrote. He added that, in his view, 3D printing was a technology that justified its hype and said it was “the sequel to the Industrial Revolution”. “However, it’s going to take somewhat longer to arrive than some people anticipate, and that may disappoint people,” he said.


corporations are again aiding in potential genocide

September 19, 2012

Says Author of IBM Holocaust book, eyed as movie by Brad Pitt,

Brad Pit at Cannes in May, 2012 (photo credit: CC-BY Georges Biard/Wikipedia Commons)
(Brad Pitt at Cannes in May 2012
(photo credit: CC-BY
Georges Biard/Wikipedia Commons))

IBM and the Holocaust
Amid reports that Pitt aims to film bestseller on computer giant’s aid to the Nazis, author Edwin Black warns of similar processes unfolding today with Iran’s nuclear drive
(Times of Israel) IBM and the Holocaust Investigative journalist and author Edwin Black was Wednesday referring all inquiries about reports that Brad Pitt plans to make a movie of his 2001 bestseller “IBM and the Holocaust” to his agents at William Morris. But in a telephone interview with The Times of Israel, Black said his meticulously documented tale of the computer giant’s key role in enabling the Holocaust holds vital lessons for today about the dangers of corporate complicity in genocide.
Specifically, as the Iranian regime speeds toward a nuclear bomb, Black said, corporations complicit with Tehran included Nokia Siemens, “which provided the cellphone tracking codes to the Iranian regime” as it suppressed the Green Revolution in 2009, as well as “the multi-national banks financing the acquisition of nuclear equipment, and the manufacturers providing the technology to produce a nuclear bomb.”
Pitt has reportedly held the film option for the book for some years, and it was in development at HBO. Now, though, it is said to be back with Pitt, for possible development as a feature film.
Black said all of his projects would make good movies because of his insistence on factual integrity. “IBM and the Holocaust,” he said, exposed what had been “the overlooked saga of how an American corporation became a central player in the Holocaust in all six phases.” He listed these as “the identification of the Jews; their exclusion from society; the confiscation of their assets; their ghettoization; their deportation; and even many parts of the extermination of the Jews.”
IBM, he noted, “had a customer site, known as the Hollerith Department, in almost every concentration camp” to sort or process punch cards and track prisoners. IBM also “opened subsidiaries in Europe in cadence with the Nazis.”

Edwin Black (photo credit: Courtesy)
Edwin Black (photo credit: Courtesy)

Black’s book details IBM’s strategic alliance with the Nazis starting from 1933, soon after Adolf Hitler came to power, and continuing deep into World War II. “As the Third Reich embarked upon its plan of conquest and genocide, IBM and its subsidiaries helped create enabling technologies, step-by-step,” according to the book’s official website. “IBM technology was used to organize nearly everything in Germany and then Nazi Europe, from the identification of the Jews in censuses, registrations, and ancestral tracing programs to the running of railroads and organizing of concentration camp slave labor.”
Reports in recent days have suggested that Pitt might star in the movie as well as producing it, and it has been reported that various A-list directors and actors are being contacted over possible roles in the production.