‘Israel released PA funds under German pressure’

December 4, 2011

Get the sub elsewhere. The Oslo agreement was broken and there is no fixing it

(jpost) German Chancellor Angela Merkel threatened Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu with the halting of a German plan to deliver a submarine to Israel if the latter refused to resume the transfer of tax revenues to the Palestinian Authority, German newspaper Welt am Sonntag reported on Sunday.

Media_httpwwwjpostcom_aibvj

According to the report, Israel yielded to pressure from Berlin and unfroze the funds. Immediately after, a German government official announced her country would build and pay up to one-third of the cost of a sixth Dolphin-class submarine to be delivered to the Israeli navy.
The agreement in principle to provide the Dolphin-class submarine, which foreign reports say enhances Israel’s second strike capability since it can carry nuclear warheads, comes a month after reports that Germany was reconsidering the deal because of anger at the announcement of plans to build some 1,100 housing units in the capital’s Gilo neighborhood, over the Green Line.
The German official said she did not know whether those reports were accurate. She said Germany will pay up to 135 million euros toward the submarine, which will cost between 372m. and 520m. euros.
Talks on the deal for the sub stalled last year after the Germans declined to underwrite it, as they had done with previous submarine purchases.


Wiesenthal Center slams Germany for participating in Durban III

September 1, 2011
In a sharply worded letter, the Simon Wiesenthal Center on Thursday slammed the German government for its plans to participate in the Durban III lynch mob in New York later this month.[MORE]

To avoid criminalization of Hamas because of Gilad Shalit, France and Germany offer de facto recognition of the Hamas government in Gaza which would allow for European investment in the territory

June 19, 2011

…Why is France getting involved with this? Gilad Shalit and his parents also hold French citizenship (they’re dual citizens). Earlier in June, Noam and Aviva Schalit appealed to the French judicial system to hold Hamas, including its Damascus-based leader Khaled Mashaal, responsible for kidnapping their son Gilad and keeping him hostage in Gaza for the past five years. If their legal effort in France is successful, arrest warrants could be issued against members of Hamas, including Mashaal. A suit can be filed in France due to Schalit’s dual citizenship.

As part of the initiative France and Germany are offering Hamas extra incentives in addition to the release of approximately 1,000 Palestinian prisoners. These incentives include easing restrictions on Gaza’s border crossings as well as de facto recognition of the Hamas government in Gaza which would allow for European investment in the territory. France and Germany are working with Egypt on the deal, according to the report. via israelmatzav.blogspot.com

hypocrisy. This is wrong.  Hamas will use their free terrorists and open borders to kill thousands of Gilad Shalits… all so the Europeans won’t have to do what they should to terrorists.

Anti-Semitism on the Rise in Germany

June 10, 2011

Soeren: Europeans Threaten to Recognize Palestinian State Unless Israel Negotiates With Terrorist Group

May 14, 2011

Several European countries are threatening to recognize an independent Palestinian state — on the basis of the pre-1967 boundaries to include the West Bank, Gaza, and with East Jerusalem as its capital — if Israel refuses to return to the negotiating table with the Palestinian Authority by September. Given the new “reconciliation deal” between the rival Palestinian factions Fatah and Hamas, Europeans are effectively demanding that Israel negotiate with Hamas, an Islamist terrorist group unambiguously committed to Israel’s destruction.
The Palestinians say they are on track to unilaterally declare statehood at the annual meeting of the United Nations General Assembly when it opens in New York in September. More than 110 countries — more than half of all UN members — have already recognized Palestine diplomatically. These includes European Union members Hungary, Poland and Romania. In recent weeks, however, the momentum to recognize a Palestinian state has been building in larger, more influential European countries.
In France, President Nicolas Sarkozy, in an interview with the L’Express newsmagazine on May 5, said: “If the peace process is still dead in September, France will face up to its responsibilities on the central question of the recognition of a Palestinian state. The idea that there is still plenty of time is dangerous. Things have to be brought to a conclusion” before September. Sarkozy also said that during the next few months, European countries would try “to relaunch the peace process along with the Americans, because Europe cannot be the main one paying for Palestine and yet remain a minor figure politically in the matter.”
On April 21, Sarkozy hosted Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas at the Élysée Palace in Paris to discuss Palestinian statehood. Ahead of that meeting, the French Foreign Ministry said the Palestinians are “more than ever ready to establish a state and run it in a credible and peaceful way.” On April 22, French Ambassador to the United Nations Gérard Araud said: “The recognition of a Palestinian state is an option that we are currently thinking about, with our European partners.” On March 22, French Prime Minister François Francois Fillon said that “2011 must be the year of the creation of a Palestinian state.” On March 15, French Foreign Minister Alain Juppé said the recognition of a Palestinian state by the European Union is a “possibility that should be kept in mind.”
In Britain, Prime Minister David Cameron told Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on May 3 that Britain is prepared to formally recognize an independent Palestinian state in September unless Israel opens peace talks with the Palestinians. That warning came after Netanyahu told Cameron that the so-called unity pact between rival Palestinian factions Fatah, which rules the West Bank, and Hamas, the Islamic resistance movement that rules Gaza, is a “tremendous blow to peace and a great victory for terrorism.” Palestinian leaders say the deal is a major step towards an independent state, but Israel fears the reconciliation will open the door to Hamas militants being deployed in the West Bank.
British diplomats described Cameron’s threat to recognize a Palestinian state as one of Britain’s few “levers” to press Israel to join talks with Palestinian officials. “The best way for the Israelis to avoid a unilateral declaration is to engage in peace talks,” a British official told the Guardian newspaper.
Despite promises to the contrary, the British government still has not amended a universal jurisdiction law that permits pro-Palestinian activist groups to bring lawsuits against Israeli politicians and military personnel for purported war crimes. On May 3, Israeli Major General Yohanan Locker was locked out of Britain. An integral member of Netanyahu’s circle of advisers and deputy head of the Israeli Air Force during Operation Cast Lead, Locker was forced to remain in Israel rather than risk arrest in London on charges of “war crimes.”
In Germany, Chancellor Angela Merkel has moved closer to other European countries in adopting an increasingly tough stance toward Israel. In February, Merkel chided Netanyahu for failing to make “a single step to advance peace.” On February 18, Germany (along with Britain and France) voted in favour of a UN Security Council resolution condemning Israeli settlement-building in disputed territory as illegal.
Nevertheless, Germany remains one of the only major European countries explicitly to say that it will not recognize a Palestinian state without Israel’s acceptance. Ahead of a visit to Berlin by Mahmoud Abbas on May 5, a German government spokesman said: “The policy of the German government remains what Chancellor [Angela] Merkel said after talks with Israel’s Prime Minister [Benjamin] Netanyahu in April: that in her view a unilateral recognition would not contribute to the goal” of a two-state solution. Merkel had said after her talks with Netanyahu on April 7 that any German recognition of a Palestinian state would be within the context of mutual Israeli-Palestinian recognition.
In Norway, Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre, in an interview with Haaretz newspaper on March 3, said that his country would consider recognizing a Palestinian state if no progress is made in the peace process by September 2011. He said Israel runs the risk of being seen internationally as a “permanent occupier” if the stalemate in the peace process continues. “Europe,” he said, “is watching for results and initiatives toward a settlement of this conflict. The major challenge for Israel in this century is that it stands out as an occupier in breach of international law. This to me is a big challenge to the quality of Israel — which is to be a democracy and a player in the first division in the world. I think that in key European capitals the hope to see that change is thinner than it used to be.”
In Spain, Foreign Minister Trinidad Jiménez said on February 9 that 2011 would be a “crucial year” for Palestinian statehood: “Spain is firmly committed to the creation of a Palestinian state. We are going to put all of our efforts and capacities to achieve it.” Spain and neighbouring France have been laying the political groundwork for the European Union to recognize a Palestinian state for more than a year.
Former Spanish Foreign Minister Miguel Ángel Moratinos and former French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner in February 2010 penned an influential article entitled, “A Palestinian State: When?” which laid out their vision for Europe’s role in creating a Palestinian state.
The article reminded readers that the European Union is the biggest single provider of financial aid to the Palestinians. Often described as a “payer but not a player” in the Middle East, the authors argued that the European Union must work more aggressively in bringing about Palestinian statehood. They also argued that time is of the essence and that the European Union “must not confine itself to the … outlines of the final settlement” and “should collectively recognize the Palestinian State.… There is no more time to lose. Europe must pave the way.” The authors say the upcoming twentieth anniversary of the Madrid peace conference, which was convened in October 1991, would be a good moment to recognize Palestinian independence.
In a separate interview with the Paris-based Journal du Dimanche, Kouchner said: “The issue currently before us is the building of a reality. France is training Palestinian police and businesses are being created in the West Bank…. It follows that one can envision the proclamation soon of a Palestinian state, and its immediate recognition by the international community, even before negotiating its borders.” He added: “If by mid-2011, the political process has not ended the [Israeli] occupation, I would bet that the developed state of Palestinian infrastructure and institutions will be such that the pressure will force Israel to give up its occupation.”
In Brussels, the European Union adopted a resolution in December 2009 that for the first time explicitly calls for Jerusalem to become the future capital of a Palestinian state. The EU declared: “If there is to be a genuine peace, a way must be found through negotiations to resolve the status of Jerusalem as the future capital of two states.” Israel has always maintained that Jerusalem will remain its undivided capital, regardless of any future peace settlement with the Palestinians. This has been the declared policy of all Israeli governments, both left and right.
Meanwhile, several European countries have already upgraded their diplomatic relations with the Palestinian Authority. On March 9, Danish Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen said that Denmark would upgrade the status of the Palestinian delegation in Copenhagen to a mission. On March 8, British Foreign Secretary William Hague announced London’s decision to upgrade its presence in Jerusalem from a delegation to a mission. On January 25, Ireland decided to upgrade the Palestinian diplomatic mission in Dublin to the status of an official embassy. Cyprus, France, Portugal and Spain have also in recent months upgraded their diplomatic relations with the Palestinians.
In an interview with France 24 television, Abbas said “a certain number of European countries have recently sent additional delegations and official representatives to the Palestinian territories. From our side, we are already treating them like ambassadors.”
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Leave a Comment » | Abbas, Abu Mazen, Alain Juppe, Brussels, David Cameron, Fatah, Fillon, Hamas, Hamas Fatah Marriage, Jiménez, Kouchner, L. L. Rasmussen, Merkel, Sarkozy, Soeren Kern, Støre, William Hague, Y. Locker | Permalink
Posted by Noah Simon


Merkel also believes Obama devalues Dollar

November 15, 2010

President Obama meets with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on the sidelines of the G-20 summit Thursday in Seoul. She rejected a U.S. proposal to try to cap global trade imbalances.

Castro accuses America
of attempting to devalue it’s currency
and says Far-Right Takes
Over U.S. After Midterms
wow….. I hope Castro is right.

At her meeting with Mr. Obama, the German leader repeated concerns about the Federal Reserve’s controversial decision last week to buy $900 billion of U.S. Treasury debt in the next six months. European officials worry the move will provoke a round of inflation and destructive currency devaluations.

President Obama meets with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on the sidelines of the G-20 summit Thursday in Seoul. She rejected a U.S. proposal to try to cap global trade imbalances. “To set political limits on trade surpluses and deficits is neither economically justified nor politically appropriate,” she told the G-20 business summit. (Associated Press)

But White House aides said the president pointed out that the U.S. dollar actually is benefiting and getting stronger because of a renewed outbreak of the European debt crisis this week. Investors on Thursday forced Ireland to pay unprecedented interest rates of near 10 percent on its bonds because of growing fears of default.
The renewed European crisis is reviving a “flight to safety” to the U.S. dollar and Treasury bonds, the president pointed out. He also repeated U.S. concerns that Germany’s attempts to attach more stringent conditions to loans to countries like Ireland that may need a bailout may be “spooking markets.”

and according to this video they are buying assets from Goldman Sachs to print the money… I suppose the money comes from the loans our government made. why is Goldman Sachs selling the government stuff when we know how dirty they are? I suppose at least it is nice to know they are buying something… but how do we know Goldman isn’t selling Oregano?

Leave a Comment » | Angela Merkel, Castro, Fidel Castro, Merkel | Permalink
Posted by Noah Simon


Merkel says German multicultural society has failed

October 16, 2010

Angela Merkel said Germany had “kidded itself” multiculturalism was working.

(BBC) Attempts to build a multicultural society in Germany have “utterly failed”, Chancellor Angela Merkel says.
In a speech in Potsdam, she said the so-called “multikulti” concept – where people would “live side-by-side” happily – did not work.
Mrs Merkel’s comments come amid recent outpourings of strong anti-immigrant feeling from mainstream politicians.
A recent survey showed that more than 30% of Germans believed Germany was “overrun by foreigners”.
The study – by the Friedrich Ebert Foundation think-tank – also showed that roughly the same number thought that some 16 million of Germany’s immigrants or people with foreign origins had come to the country for the social benefits.
Mrs Merkel told a gathering of younger members of her conservative Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party on Saturday that at “the beginning of the 60s our country called the foreign workers to come to Germany and now they live in our country… We kidded ourselves a while, we said: ‘They won’t stay, sometime they will be gone’, but this isn’t reality.
“And of course, the approach [to build] a multicultural [society] and to live side-by-side and to enjoy each other… has failed, utterly failed.”
More…

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Leave a Comment » | Merkel | Permalink
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