Fujimori Humanitarian Pardon

June 17, 2011

In recent weeks, several prominent politicians have advocated a “humanitarian pardon” for Fujimori due to his deteriorating health. The former president was sentenced in 2009 to 25 years in prison for human rights violations, including the extrajudicial execution of 15 people in the Barrios Altos district of Lima, the enforced disappearance and murder of nine students and a teacher from La Cantuta University, and two abductions. via hrw.org and image via topnews.in

Fujimori found guilty of human rights abuses
Harakiri_Seppuku_backdrop_poster


“Rather than fall into the hands of their enemies, ancient Japanese samurai preferred to die with honour, voluntarily plunging a sword into the abdomen and moving it left to right in a slicing motion. via penn-olson.com Those Japs would commit Harry Carry instead of surrendering in WWII, thinking it was a more honorable death. via urbandictionary.com


Japan Apologizes for WWII Before Obama Can

August 16, 2010

We figure Obama’s TelePrompter was being loaded with the text calling on Americans to hang their heads in collective shame for daring to win World War II. But those sneaky Japanese beat him to the punch and apologized for their unsavory behavior before and during the war.

Asia paused on Sunday to remember Japan’s surrender to the Allied forces ending World War II 65 years ago.
The Japanese prime minister apologized for wreaking suffering on the region, and the South Korean president said Tokyo’s remorse was a step in the right direction.
From Nanjing, China – the site of a 1937 massacre by Japanese troops – to Tokyo’s Yasukuni Shrine, which has drawn outrage from Asia for honoring Class A war criminals, people prayed for the millions who died in war and expressed hopes for peace.
The reckoning with history has taken special meaning this year as it comes amid a global effort to realize a world without nuclear weapons, a resolve backed by President Barack Obama. But there were reminders of lingering tensions.
In Seoul, South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, dressed in traditional robes, led a ceremony celebrating the liberation of the Korean peninsula from Japan’s 1910-45 colonial rule with the Aug. 15 surrender. He also urged North Korea to abandon military provocations and make a “courageous change” toward peace.
In Tokyo, at a ceremony for the war dead, Prime Minister Naoto Kan reiterated his apology to South Korea for wartime atrocities, and this time offered his regret to all of Asia.
Last week, Kan offered “deep remorse” in an apology issued ahead of the 100th anniversary of the Japanese annexation of the Korean peninsula on Aug. 29, 1910.
“We caused great damage and suffering to many nations during the war, especially to the people of Asia,” Kan said Sunday before a crowd of about 6,000, including Emperor Akihito. “We feel a deep regret, and we offer our sincere feelings of condolence to those who suffered and their families.”

I bet that slap in the face really stings… you deserve it Obama


RubinReports: America’s War with Japan: Tom Hanks Isn’t the Problem but Teaching Anti-Americanism Is

March 13, 2010

Tom Hanks apparently made a statement that was critical of the United States:

If you were expecting an island-hopping reprise of “Band of Brothers” in this new miniseries, expect otherwise.

But the context for Hanks’ history lessons has changed. Band of Brothers, HBO’s best-selling DVD to date, began airing two days before 9/11; The Pacific, his new 10-hour epic about the Pacific theater in World War II, plays out against a very different backdrop, when the country is weary of war and American exceptionalism is a much tougher sell. World War II in the European theater was a case of massive armies arrayed against an unambiguous evil. The Pacific war was mainly fought by isolated groups of men and was overlaid by a sense that our foes were fundamentally different from us. In that sense, the war in the Pacific bears a closer relation to the complex war on terrorism the U.S. is waging now, making the new series a trickier prospect but one with potential for more depth and resonance. “Certainly, we wanted to honor U.S. bravery in The Pacific,” Hanks says. “But we also wanted to have people say, ‘We didn’t know our troops did that to Japanese people.’”

And he is pleased that The Pacific has fulfilled an obligation to our World War II vets. He doesn’t see the series as simply eye-opening history. He hopes it offers Americans a chance to ponder the sacrifices of our current soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. “From the outset, we wanted to make people wonder how our troops can re-enter society in the first place,” Hanks says. “How could they just pick up their lives and get on with the rest of us? Back in World War II, we viewed the Japanese as ‘yellow, slant-eyed dogs’ that believed in different gods. They were out to kill us because our way of living was different. We, in turn, wanted to annihilate them because they were different. Does that sound familiar, by any chance, to what’s going on today?”

there were a number of reasons for the internment which made sense at the time. The German and Italian fascist governments were usurpers who had seized power. In contrast, the Japanese government was a “legitimate” regime supported by the emperor. The emperor was viewed by Japanese as a god, the head of their religion. While most German- and Italian-Americans opposed the regimes with which the United States was at war, there was no such opposition from the Japanese.


What Obama could of learned from Nixon about Asian Diplomacy

December 27, 2009

It isn’t only White folks who are good old boys…

Obama: “I am greatly dishonored Emperor Akihito, for owing you so much money!”

Obama didn’t get what he wanted in China because (1) Jimmy Carter is partly right (it is racism, but not American, rather Chinese racism towards Africans) (2) Obama bowed to the Japanese Emperor and that really pissed off the people we owe a lot of money to. Global Warming science might be a sham, but industrial cooperation between nations is important for other reasons. Polution is a problem that effects more then Carbon Monoxide levels. Carbon and Petroleum based burning could polute water and cause all kinds of illnesses. It is a shame that Obama couldn’t learn how to handle actual diplomacy which has nothing to do with popularity on TV and has a lot to do with how you effect people in an intimate relationship. Obama is a failure at talking man to man. For a guy who has been touting diplomacy, Obama failed to understand that real diplomacy was done by men like Richard Nixon who might of not been great mass media stars, but certainly knew how to relate to people in a small room of educated elitist minds. Only Nixon could of gone to China. We would of all been dead if they sent Obama there in the 70s.
Why did Chinese premier Wen Jiabao choose to publicly humiliate Barack Obama at Copenhagen? In their eyes, and those of much of the world, he has lost face, and with it, power and influence. While getting widespread play overseas, this story has been kept very quiet by our disinterested, nonpartisan media (I haven’t seen it mentioned in any major U.S. outlet).

After promising to meet the Messiah at 7:00 p.m., Premier Wen stiffed him in favor of a meeting with the leaders of India, South Africa, and Brazil. Rather than wait, a no-doubt infuriated Obama stalked into the room in question and demanded, “Are you ready to see me, Premier Wen?” No word on Wen’s reaction, though he did submit to a discussion on the spot that evidently sealed the release of the immortal and glorious Copenhagen Quasi-Agreement on Climate Change.

So with Barack Obama, we’ve reached the point where the leader of record of the most powerful state in history has become a man you can casually stand up. But the question remains, why?

There are a number of reasons why the Chinese might take a cavalier attitude toward an American leader. China is the chief foreign holder of American debt, which may well have created an impression of the U.S. as a beggar nation on the level of a failed African republic. (I strongly suspect that words were exchanged on this topic during Obama’s recent visit to China, though we’re unlikely ever to learn about them in detail.)

There’s also the matter of race. As is true of most Asians, the Chinese sense of racial superiority is cultural and innate. This is a people who refer to Caucasians as “ghost shadows”; what they think of American blacks is probably best not dwelt upon.

Then there’s the deep aura of unseriousness that Obama has generated around himself. Though essentially incalculable, this factor is undeniable and will grow in importance and impact as time passes.

But there’s one event in particular that very likely played a part — the fact that, only a few weeks before, Obama publicly and notoriously bowed to the emperor of Japan.

Japan and China have a lengthy history, very little of which can be termed benign. They have always been rivals, often acting at cross purposes and usually at sword’s point. But the past century of Sino-Japanese relations has been little short of horrendous.

Japan’s militarist government occupied Manchuria in 1931 and proceeded to menace the Republic of China for several years afterward. In June 1937, as a result of a contrived confrontation known as the “Marco Polo Bridge Incident”, Japan escalated to open conquest. Occupying Nanking in December of that year, the Japanese army carried out a city-wide massacre that in little more than a month resulted in over 250,000 deaths. So brutal were Japanese actions that they could not, in a pre-Auschwitz world, be referred to directly in news accounts. Sixty years passed before the story was completely told in Iris Chang’s The Rape of Nanking(Chang, a less than stable personality in the first place, was so deeply affected that she later committed suicide, after telling friends that she could not get the images of the killings out of her mind.)

For nearly a decade Japan occupied vast areas of China, a period marked by further massacres, atrocities, and casual violations of the human spirit. It’s safe to say that, but for the even viler activities of the Nazis, the Japanese occupation would stand as one of the peak moments of human cruelty in the modern era. (It’s undeniable that Japanese human experiments in their Chinese and Manchurian prison camps were fully as loathsome as those of the Nazis.)

Though the Chinese don’t discuss the matter, their attitude toward Japan and the Japanese can easily be imagined. Particularly since Japan, unlike Germany, has only in recent years reached the point of admitting to “irregularities” in its occupation, much less issuing an apology or offering reparations.

So here comes Obama, as ignorant of all this as a little lamb.

Many will recall the uproar that surrounded Ronald Reagan’s 1985 visit to a German cemetery at Bitburg, instigated by the existence of SS graves within line of sight of the ceremony. The attitude of the Chinese to Obama’s bow must be similar. From that point of view, Wen’s behavior should be taken as a rebuke, not to the United States so much as to Obama personally.

Which only goes to underline the reason why diplomatic protocol exists in the first place — to exclude through ritual actions all possibilities that error, misunderstanding, or personal pique might interfere with matters of state. Obama has yet to learn this. His insistence on winging it, on reinventing established practice on his own terms, is potentially far more than simply embarrassing. It could be actively dangerous. His refusal to go by the rules may well have cost him the opportunity to pose as Savior of Gaia in Copenhagen. It may cost him — and the country — far more at some future time.

The press is going buck wild about Obama bowing to Emperor Akihito. Make what you want of it. Some say that Obama was showing a sign of respect, others say it was totally inappropriate and it was Obama showing the weakness of the USA. But I know the truth! Obama was thanking Emeror Akihito for buying MORE US government debt. As Bloomberg reported, Japan had bought AN ADDITIONAL $105 billion dollars of US Treasuries this year, which exceeded this year’s amount of US debt that China bought. Hell, if I loaned someone $105 billion dollars, they better bow before me! Hahaha.

Check out this funny video that compares the Obama-Akihito meeting with Akihito shaking hands with politicians and royalties of other nations. Notice how the other politicians and royalties did not bow?


What Obama could of learned from Nixon about Asian Diplomacy

December 27, 2009

It isn’t only White folks who are good old boys…

Obama: “I am greatly dishonored Emperor Akihito, for owing you so much money!”

Obama didn’t get what he wanted in China because (1) Jimmy Carter is partly right (it is racism, but not American, rather Chinese racism towards Africans) (2) Obama bowed to the Japanese Emperor and that really pissed off the people we owe a lot of money to. Global Warming science might be a sham, but industrial cooperation between nations is important for other reasons. Polution is a problem that effects more then Carbon Monoxide levels. Carbon and Petroleum based burning could polute water and cause all kinds of illnesses. It is a shame that Obama couldn’t learn how to handle actual diplomacy which has nothing to do with popularity on TV and has a lot to do with how you effect people in an intimate relationship. Obama is a failure at talking man to man. For a guy who has been touting diplomacy, Obama failed to understand that real diplomacy was done by men like Richard Nixon who might of not been great mass media stars, but certainly knew how to relate to people in a small room of educated elitist minds. Only Nixon could of gone to China. We would of all been dead if they sent Obama there in the 70s.
Why did Chinese premier Wen Jiabao choose to publicly humiliate Barack Obama at Copenhagen? In their eyes, and those of much of the world, he has lost face, and with it, power and influence. While getting widespread play overseas, this story has been kept very quiet by our disinterested, nonpartisan media (I haven’t seen it mentioned in any major U.S. outlet).

After promising to meet the Messiah at 7:00 p.m., Premier Wen stiffed him in favor of a meeting with the leaders of India, South Africa, and Brazil. Rather than wait, a no-doubt infuriated Obama stalked into the room in question and demanded, “Are you ready to see me, Premier Wen?” No word on Wen’s reaction, though he did submit to a discussion on the spot that evidently sealed the release of the immortal and glorious Copenhagen Quasi-Agreement on Climate Change.

So with Barack Obama, we’ve reached the point where the leader of record of the most powerful state in history has become a man you can casually stand up. But the question remains, why?

There are a number of reasons why the Chinese might take a cavalier attitude toward an American leader. China is the chief foreign holder of American debt, which may well have created an impression of the U.S. as a beggar nation on the level of a failed African republic. (I strongly suspect that words were exchanged on this topic during Obama’s recent visit to China, though we’re unlikely ever to learn about them in detail.)

There’s also the matter of race. As is true of most Asians, the Chinese sense of racial superiority is cultural and innate. This is a people who refer to Caucasians as “ghost shadows”; what they think of American blacks is probably best not dwelt upon.

Then there’s the deep aura of unseriousness that Obama has generated around himself. Though essentially incalculable, this factor is undeniable and will grow in importance and impact as time passes.

But there’s one event in particular that very likely played a part — the fact that, only a few weeks before, Obama publicly and notoriously bowed to the emperor of Japan.

Japan and China have a lengthy history, very little of which can be termed benign. They have always been rivals, often acting at cross purposes and usually at sword’s point. But the past century of Sino-Japanese relations has been little short of horrendous.

Japan’s militarist government occupied Manchuria in 1931 and proceeded to menace the Republic of China for several years afterward. In June 1937, as a result of a contrived confrontation known as the “Marco Polo Bridge Incident”, Japan escalated to open conquest. Occupying Nanking in December of that year, the Japanese army carried out a city-wide massacre that in little more than a month resulted in over 250,000 deaths. So brutal were Japanese actions that they could not, in a pre-Auschwitz world, be referred to directly in news accounts. Sixty years passed before the story was completely told in Iris Chang’s The Rape of Nanking(Chang, a less than stable personality in the first place, was so deeply affected that she later committed suicide, after telling friends that she could not get the images of the killings out of her mind.)

For nearly a decade Japan occupied vast areas of China, a period marked by further massacres, atrocities, and casual violations of the human spirit. It’s safe to say that, but for the even viler activities of the Nazis, the Japanese occupation would stand as one of the peak moments of human cruelty in the modern era. (It’s undeniable that Japanese human experiments in their Chinese and Manchurian prison camps were fully as loathsome as those of the Nazis.)

Though the Chinese don’t discuss the matter, their attitude toward Japan and the Japanese can easily be imagined. Particularly since Japan, unlike Germany, has only in recent years reached the point of admitting to “irregularities” in its occupation, much less issuing an apology or offering reparations.

So here comes Obama, as ignorant of all this as a little lamb.

Many will recall the uproar that surrounded Ronald Reagan’s 1985 visit to a German cemetery at Bitburg, instigated by the existence of SS graves within line of sight of the ceremony. The attitude of the Chinese to Obama’s bow must be similar. From that point of view, Wen’s behavior should be taken as a rebuke, not to the United States so much as to Obama personally.

Which only goes to underline the reason why diplomatic protocol exists in the first place — to exclude through ritual actions all possibilities that error, misunderstanding, or personal pique might interfere with matters of state. Obama has yet to learn this. His insistence on winging it, on reinventing established practice on his own terms, is potentially far more than simply embarrassing. It could be actively dangerous. His refusal to go by the rules may well have cost him the opportunity to pose as Savior of Gaia in Copenhagen. It may cost him — and the country — far more at some future time.

The press is going buck wild about Obama bowing to Emperor Akihito. Make what you want of it. Some say that Obama was showing a sign of respect, others say it was totally inappropriate and it was Obama showing the weakness of the USA. But I know the truth! Obama was thanking Emeror Akihito for buying MORE US government debt. As Bloomberg reported, Japan had bought AN ADDITIONAL $105 billion dollars of US Treasuries this year, which exceeded this year’s amount of US debt that China bought. Hell, if I loaned someone $105 billion dollars, they better bow before me! Hahaha.

Check out this funny video that compares the Obama-Akihito meeting with Akihito shaking hands with politicians and royalties of other nations. Notice how the other politicians and royalties did not bow?


Shiloh Musings: President sic Abbas: World Must Recognize 1967 Borders Reference for Negotiations

December 15, 2009

President sic Abbas: “World Must Recognize 1967 Borders Reference for Negotiations.” So, nu, if that’s the case, what’s the point of negotiations?

Hat tip IMRA

As I’ve blogged previously, I’ve been watching a series of old World War Two newsreels and documentaries on the same subject with my father. It’s outrageous, unbelievable and frightening to think of how totally and tragically incompetent and unrealistic the American military and politicians were until they were attacked. Even when the masses of Japanese planes were spotted flying to Hawaii, the “experts” ordered the observers to “disregard.” Just like Yom Kippur 1973!

There are times one shouldn’t obey orders!

And even though Hitler kept repeating that Germany is going to take over the world, Europe kept negotiating “peace in our time.”


Shiloh Musings: President sic Abbas: World Must Recognize 1967 Borders Reference for Negotiations

December 15, 2009

President sic Abbas: “World Must Recognize 1967 Borders Reference for Negotiations.” So, nu, if that’s the case, what’s the point of negotiations?

Hat tip IMRA

As I’ve blogged previously, I’ve been watching a series of old World War Two newsreels and documentaries on the same subject with my father. It’s outrageous, unbelievable and frightening to think of how totally and tragically incompetent and unrealistic the American military and politicians were until they were attacked. Even when the masses of Japanese planes were spotted flying to Hawaii, the “experts” ordered the observers to “disregard.” Just like Yom Kippur 1973!

There are times one shouldn’t obey orders!

And even though Hitler kept repeating that Germany is going to take over the world, Europe kept negotiating “peace in our time.”

Posted via web from noahdavidsimon’s posterous