Torturing the Truth at Duke Divinity

April 28, 2011
Should we automatically accept — at face value — Duke University’s first Muslim chaplain, Abdullah Antepli, as part of an emerging loyal, moderate American Islam, simply because he insists that we do so?

Perhaps not, when all his words and associations are taken into account.  He seems eager to join hands with others — Muslim, Christian, and secular — who express animosity toward this country and Western societies in general.  And at one recent event, he attacked the citizens of his adopted country for their failure to blindly assume Muslim immigrants mean them well.

“Being a Muslim in the United States is another form of torture, a psychological torture, an emotional torture, and it’s just getting worse,” he declared at the “Toward a Moral Consensus against Torture” conference at Duke University on March 25-26.  The conference attracted approximately 100 left-wing academics, theologians, and members of the local activist community for some old-fashioned America-bashing.

Antepli revealed that this so-called “torture” is not the result of overt acts directed at him, but comes from his perception that many Americans are antagonistic to Muslims and expect Muslims “to prove our loyalty to this land.”  Such demands to “prove that we belong” stem from a “great level of arrogance,” he added.

Antepli’s condemnation of America did not stop there.  He claimed that our government’s use of torture (if that is what we have indeed been doing) is merely a “symptom of a larger pathological issue.”  American society, he contended, has been suffering from a “psychological, spiritual, moral disease.”

No mention was made about how Islamic societies compare in this regard.  If America is a “sick” society — and Islamic societies are healthy — then why are Muslims flocking to our shores in large numbers?

Ingrid Mattson

Antepli was joined at the torture conference by keynote speaker Ingrid Mattson.  She is the director and dominant figure in Islamic Studies at Hartford Seminary, where Antepli received his master’s degree (and where he continues to be a doctoral candidate).  Given the small size of the faculty in that program, her prominence, and their common interests, it is hard to imagine that she had no influence on him.

If so, what an influence she would be, for she has gained national notoriety as a defender of some of Islam’s unsavory aspects. She was recently dubbed by the New York Times as “perhaps the most noticed figure among American Muslim women.”  She is the former president of the Islamic Society of North America, which was named by the U.S. Justice Department as an unindicted co-conspirator in a case involving a charity that funneled money to Hamas.  Many sources say the ISNA is a front for the Muslim Brotherhood, the wellspring of terrorist organizations such as Hamas and Al Qaeda.

At Duke, Mattson focused on the immorality of U.S. interrogation techniques.  Many of her charges rested on fallacies.  For instance, she equated unauthorized crimes committed by a few rogue soldiers in Afghanistan who killed and mutilated civilians for sport — for which they will be severely punished by the U.S. military — with government-approved interrogation that leaves no permanent damage. 

Such inaccuracies seem to be deliberate subterfuge: since the U.S. interrogation techniques do not stir revulsion by themselves, she tied the gruesome acts of a few soldiers who illegally went beyond the pale of civilized warfare to sophisticated, by-the-book interrogation efforts. 

Yet, her comments were standard fare at “Toward a Moral Consensus against Torture.”  Participation in such events raises flags about where loyalties lie for everybody, not just Muslims.  Speakers cited a predictable litany of supposed abuses committed by the U.S. in the War on Terror and elsewhere.

This was hardly the first time Antepli approvingly shared the podium with questionable company at Duke.  Two years ago, he was one of the main contributors to an Israel-bashing “teach-in,” at which he appeared to be complicit with two of his fellow speakers who denied the legitimacy of Israel’s existence and justified terrorist acts aimed at Israel.

If Antepli truly is a loyal American, perhaps he should forgo associations with the radical left and with academics such as Mattson who are strongly identified with radical Islam.  Otherwise, as a man of faith, he should be able to forgive us our suspicions.

Jay Schalin is Senior Writer at the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy.  He wrote this article for Campus Watch, a project of the Middle East Forum.
Posted via email from noahdavidsimon’s posterous

Duke Lacrosse Accuser Crystal Mangum Charged With Murder

April 23, 2011

Boy has this chick come back to bite the lamestream media in the ass:

It was a tiny item in the New York Times — a brief at the bottom of page B14 of Tuesday’s sports section, under Lacrosse: “Crystal Mangum, who falsely accused three Duke players of raping her in 2006, was charged with murder in the death of her boyfriend.” The man died two weeks after Mangum stabbed him, and Mangum has now been charged with murder.


The Times may prefer to forget that name, but it was far more interested in Crystal Mangum back in 2006. More than any other media outlet, the Times trumpeted her rape accusations against three Duke lacrosse players, accusations that quickly fell apart in a mass of contradictions and shifting stories.


Yet even as the case fell apart and other liberal media outlets were backing away, the Times issued a now-notorious, error-riddled 5,000-word lead story by Duff Wilson on August 25, 2006, concluding that there was enough evidence against the players for Michael Nifong, the soon-to-be-disgraced-and-jailed local prosecutor, to bring the case to trial:


By disclosing pieces of evidence favorable to the defendants, the defense has created an image of a case heading for the rocks. But an examination of the entire 1,850 pages of evidence gathered by the prosecution in the four months after the accusation yields a more ambiguous picture. It shows that while there are big weaknesses in Mr. Nifong’s case, there is also a body of evidence to support his decision to take the matter to a jury.


Perhaps most atrocious was former columnist Selena Roberts, who made a habit of slurring the innocent Duke lacrosse players. Even after the players had been all but formally cleared of the sexual assault, she continued to blame white privilege: “Don’t mess with Duke, though. To shine a light on its integrity has been treated by the irrational mighty as a threat to white privilege. Feel free to excoriate the African-American basketball stars and football behemoths for the misdeeds of all athletes, but lay off the lacrosse pipeline to Wall Street, excuse the khaki-pants crowd of SAT wonder kids.”

it is very hard for men to protect themselves from women whose testimony is full of contradictions. the media and liberal judges don’t do a thing when a woman commits perjury.

Posted via email from noahdavidsimon’s posterous

"Gray Lady Down," a debate on the Times, and an AY mention

March 21, 2011


photo

Atlantic Yards Report

Having read William McGowan’s book Gray Lady Down: What the Decline and Fall of The New York Times Means for America, I knew it does not address such relatively local issues at Atlantic Yards (built by the Times Company’s business partner on the Times Tower, Forest City Ratner), but instead more ideological issues such as gay marriage, immigration, the Duke “rape” case, and the war on terror. 
So McGowan didn’t bring up Atlantic Yards during a debate last month with Michael Tomasky, American editor-at-large for the Guardian, at St. Francis College in Brooklyn Heights. (Tomasky’s main point was that the allegedly halcyon days of the past featured flawed coverage, especially in scope, of a different stripe.)

I think the issue is somewhat murky. I have no doubt that the editorial page is committed, by virtue of the “spirit of the Times” (aka Sulzberger), to supporting Atlantic Yards, or, at least, keeping its mouth shut about dismaying details.
Is the Metro desk in the tank? I don’t think so–and I can’t let myself think so. But the Times has done, on the whole, a lousy job covering Atlantic Yards.
Editors make choices, and the Times has chosen to put far less energy into looking carefully at Atlantic Yards than at a number of other issues. Meanwhile, the Sports section laps up Nets publicity.

link

“Lifeforce” 1985 International one sheet image via doppelganger
and via
thatsmyface.com

Media nervous on new Duke U. rape case (updated)

January 8, 2010

the rule goes like this… if it is young men and there is an accusation the swarm them like flies, but if it is a homosexual who molests a little boy then it isn’t a story… this is the culture we live in. the real rape case at Duke. btw… I’m tired of getting hit on by gay men. When are we going to stand up and tell gay men that if heterosexuals have to go through this crap with women that we don’t need to deal with their advances as well.

A new and even more scandalous rape allegation has surfaced at Duke University. Yet the usual media and campus PC crowd are keeping mighty quiet. Identity politics apparently trumps all sense of outrage.

Of course, after the disgraceful media and university reaction to the phony allegations against Duke Lacrosse team members, it is wise avoid jumping to conclusions, but the comparative silence on the current case is nonetheless remarkable, considering how many particulars of the case were left out of the main AP account.

Mike Adams, writing on Townhall, lays out the facts the MSM won’t:

Frank Lombard is the associate director of Duke’s Center for Health Policy. The university administrator was recently arrested by the FBI and charged with offering up his adopted 5-year-old son for sex. I tried to contact Frank Lombard over the weekend to probe his expertise regarding the health benefits of raping small children. So far, he’s declined to comment.

University administrator Lombard is accused of logging on to a chat room online and describing himself as a “perv dad for fun.” The detective who wisely looked into the suspicious screen name says that Lombard admitted to molesting his own adopted son. All this was before allegedly inviting a stranger to travel to North Carolina from another state to statutorily rape his already-molested adopted son.

It gets worse. The allegations are stunning and sickening. Adams spares us what he says is the worst.

However, identity politics are probably also involved in understanding the media response. Again, Adams:

The Associate Press (AP) did not mention the fact that the five-year old offered up for molestation was black. Bringing that fact to light might be damaging to the political coalition that exists between blacks and gays. Nor did the AP mention that the adopted child is being raised by a homosexual couple. Bringing that fact to light might harm the gay adoption movement.

I am afraid that as far as the media and academic communities are involved, it is not the crime itself that matters, but rather whether the alleged perp is a member of an “oppressor” group. Although white, Lombard is gay, so in the interest of avoiding unpleasant stories involving homosexual adoption, the media is anxious to shut down public interest in the affair.

However, the outspokenness and willingness to judge in advance a case involving white jocks – easy targets – of Duke and media, inevitably place a spotlight on their handling of another Duke rape allegation.

Hat tip: Richard Baehr

Update: Thomas Lifson notes that Stanley B. Chambers of the Raleigh News and Observer (hat tip: C. Edmund Wright) brings is the following nugget:

Lombard, a licensed clinical social worker with a master’s degree in social work, is a health-disparities researcher who studies HIV/AIDS in the rural South.

This means that Lombard toiled in fields of the victimology industry, mining data for correlations that would underwrite government favoritism of victim groups.

A victimologist victimized at least one child in the most heinous way. The ultimate victim(s). And the media see no hypocrisy, and want to make sure the public doesn’t either. Nothing to see here, move along.

All this coming in the wake of another highly publicized incident at the same prominent university? I don’t think they can suppress this one. The conservative media have the power to put this case on the national agenda. It is too dramatic.


Media nervous on new Duke U. rape case (updated)

January 8, 2010

the rule goes like this… if it is young men and there is an accusation the swarm them like flies, but if it is a homosexual who molests a little boy then it isn’t a story… this is the culture we live in. the real rape case at Duke. btw… I’m tired of getting hit on by gay men. When are we going to stand up and tell gay men that if heterosexuals have to go through this crap with women that we don’t need to deal with their advances as well.

A new and even more scandalous rape allegation has surfaced at Duke University. Yet the usual media and campus PC crowd are keeping mighty quiet. Identity politics apparently trumps all sense of outrage.

Of course, after the disgraceful media and university reaction to the phony allegations against Duke Lacrosse team members, it is wise avoid jumping to conclusions, but the comparative silence on the current case is nonetheless remarkable, considering how many particulars of the case were left out of the main AP account.

Mike Adams, writing on Townhall, lays out the facts the MSM won’t:

Frank Lombard is the associate director of Duke’s Center for Health Policy. The university administrator was recently arrested by the FBI and charged with offering up his adopted 5-year-old son for sex. I tried to contact Frank Lombard over the weekend to probe his expertise regarding the health benefits of raping small children. So far, he’s declined to comment.

University administrator Lombard is accused of logging on to a chat room online and describing himself as a “perv dad for fun.” The detective who wisely looked into the suspicious screen name says that Lombard admitted to molesting his own adopted son. All this was before allegedly inviting a stranger to travel to North Carolina from another state to statutorily rape his already-molested adopted son.

It gets worse. The allegations are stunning and sickening. Adams spares us what he says is the worst.

However, identity politics are probably also involved in understanding the media response. Again, Adams:

The Associate Press (AP) did not mention the fact that the five-year old offered up for molestation was black. Bringing that fact to light might be damaging to the political coalition that exists between blacks and gays. Nor did the AP mention that the adopted child is being raised by a homosexual couple. Bringing that fact to light might harm the gay adoption movement.

I am afraid that as far as the media and academic communities are involved, it is not the crime itself that matters, but rather whether the alleged perp is a member of an “oppressor” group. Although white, Lombard is gay, so in the interest of avoiding unpleasant stories involving homosexual adoption, the media is anxious to shut down public interest in the affair.

However, the outspokenness and willingness to judge in advance a case involving white jocks – easy targets – of Duke and media, inevitably place a spotlight on their handling of another Duke rape allegation.

Hat tip: Richard Baehr

Update: Thomas Lifson notes that Stanley B. Chambers of the Raleigh News and Observer (hat tip: C. Edmund Wright) brings is the following nugget:

Lombard, a licensed clinical social worker with a master’s degree in social work, is a health-disparities researcher who studies HIV/AIDS in the rural South.

This means that Lombard toiled in fields of the victimology industry, mining data for correlations that would underwrite government favoritism of victim groups.

A victimologist victimized at least one child in the most heinous way. The ultimate victim(s). And the media see no hypocrisy, and want to make sure the public doesn’t either. Nothing to see here, move along.

All this coming in the wake of another highly publicized incident at the same prominent university? I don’t think they can suppress this one. The conservative media have the power to put this case on the national agenda. It is too dramatic.