THE MOST DANGEROUS DOMESTIC SPYING PROGRAM IS COMMON CORE

September 8, 2013
(Ben Swan)(h/t John Turner)Bill Gates was one of the leaders of Common Core, putting his personal money into its development, implementation and promotion, so it’s unsurprising that much of this data mining will occur via Microsoft’s Cloud system.

Even the Department of Education, though, admits that privacy is a concern, and that that some of the data gathered may be “of a sensitive nature.”  The information collected will be more than sensitive; much of it will also be completely unrelated to education.  Data collected will not only include grades, test scores, name, date of birth and social security number, it will also include parents’ political affiliations, individual or familial mental or psychological problems, beliefs, religious practices and income.
In addition, all activities, as well as those deemed demeaning, self-incriminating or anti-social, will be stored in students’ school records.  In other words, not only will permanently stored data reflect criminal activities, it will also reflect bullying or anything perceived as abnormal.  The mere fact that the White House notes the program can be used to “automatically demonstrate proof of competency in a work setting” means such data is intended to affect students’ futures.
Perhaps even more alarming is the fact that data collection will also include critical appraisals of individuals with whom students have close family relationships.  The Common Core program has been heavily scrutinized recently for the fact that its curriculum teaches young children to use emotionally charged language to manipulate others and teaches students how to become community organizers and experts of the U.N.’s agenda 21.
Combined with this form of data collection, it’s easy to envision truly disturbing untruths and distortions making their way into the permanent record.
Like Common Core, states were bribed with grant money from the federal government to implement data mining, and 47 states have now implemented some form of data mining from the educational system.  Only 9 have implemented the full Common Core data mining program.  Though there are restrictions which make storing data difficult on the federal level, states can easily store the data and allow the federal government to access it at its own discretion.
The government won’t be the only organization with access to the information.  School administrators have full control over student files, and they can choose who to share information with.  Theoretically, the information could be sold, perhaps withholding identifying information.  In addition, schools can  share records with any “school official” without parental consent.  The term “school official,” however, includes private companies which have contracts with the school. (more)

Osama bin Laden raid yields trove of computer data

May 3, 2011

The house where Osama bin Laden allegedly lived is shown in Abbottabad, Pakistan. | AP Photo

Material found in bin Laden’s house is being examined at a secret location in Afghanistan. 
The assault force of Navy SEALs snatched a trove of computer drives and disks during their weekend raid on Osama bin Laden’s compound, yielding what a U.S. official called “the mother lode of intelligence.”
The special operations forces grabbed personal computers, thumb drives and electronic equipment during the lightning raid that killed bin Laden, officials told POLITICO.
“They cleaned it out,” one official said. “Can you imagine what’s on Osama bin Laden’s hard drive?”U.S. officials are about to find out. The material is being examined at a secret location in Afghanistan.
“Hundreds of people are going through it now,” an official said, adding that intelligence operatives back in Washington are very excited to find out what they have.
“It’s going to be great even if only 10 percent of it is actionable,” the official said.
Savoring the military and intelligence triumph, officials late Monday described new details about how the mission unfolded:
The SEALs took fire on their way to the compound’s third floor, where bin Laden had been sleeping, officials said. The encounter with bin Laden lasted only seconds, and ended with a kill shot to his face.
The team’s photos of bin Laden are gruesome, complicating officials’ deliberations about whether to release them.
Officials also have images of bin Laden in a white shroud before his burial at sea.
The raid was not supposed to last more than 30 minutes. The forces finished in 38 minutes, even though they lost one of their choppers and had to go to a back-up plan.
Four helicopters were used in the raid. Two went in, and two were in reserve.
Hovering above the compound on the way in, one of the choppers developed a mechanical problem that caused it to lose lift, officials said. The pilot made a controlled landing, according to the officials. When he couldn’t get the bird airborne again, the SEALs blew it up and left in one of the reserves.
Officials described the reaction of the special operators when they were told a number of weeks ago that they had been chosen to train for the mission.
“They were told, ‘We think we found Osama bin Laden, and your job is to kill him,’” an official recalled.
The SEALs started to cheer.
Radioing a commander on Sunday, the team reported the capture with a pre-arranged signal: “Geronimo!”
AP Photo Close by MIKE ALLEN | 5/2/11 7:51 PM EDT  via politico.com

European Swift Accounts and Data Freedom

March 11, 2010

While Europe hopes that America will assist it in its crack-down on “racist” websites and blogs, it is less keen to assist America in its battle against terrorism. In this context, civil-liberties and privacy concerns are invoked to deny the U.S. continued access to financial information from SWIFT (the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication), an international banking consortium, headquartered in Brussels, which processes inter-bank data. SWIFT processes millions of transactions daily between banks and other financial institutions worldwide. It holds the data of some 8,000 banks and operates in 200 countries.

The European Parliament has nixed any cooperation with the US regarding SWIFT data. What’s really mind-blowing, however, is that America had direct access to the data until its servers were moved to Europe at the end of 2009. That really made the headlines here, didn’t it? What one might be inclined to call a real swift move by the Obama administration. That is, if they had a choice.

one of the more interesting points in Mr. Belien’s post:

One of these NGOs is the Movement Against Racism and for Friendship among Peoples (French acronym MRAP), that monitors “racism” in France. Last January, the MRAP presented a 154-page report [pdf], listing more than 2,000 URLs (including 1,000 blogs) deemed to be “racist”, “racialist”, “ethno-differentialist”, “extreme-right”, “anti-Semitic,” “Islamophobic,” “homophobic,” “ultra-Zionist,” etc. The website of the American scholar Daniel Pipes is listed on page 129 as a “neoconservative” site which “develops Islamophobic themes.”

Imagine the hours these flunkies spent surfing the internet just to find writings and images they consider offensive. Imagine the time it took to create these categories. Why “ultra-Zionist” when they detest Zionism itself? And is there any category of “right” that is not prefaced with “extreme”? The two words have become synonymous. And do you think they’ve listed the Islamist web sites that have fatwahs and rantings about the evil West? Or is that protected under religious speech?