Of course the Nanny State has a response to Aaron Swartz

January 23, 2013

(Swartz suicide won’t change computer crime policy, says prosecutor • The Register) The aggressive prosecution of computer crimes won’t be changed in light of the suicide of internet activist Aaron Swartz, a spokeswoman for Boston US Attorney Carmen Ortiz has said.
“Absolutely not,” Ortiz told the Boston Herald. “We thought the case was reasonably handled and we would not have done things differently. We’re going to continue doing the work of the office and of following our mission.”

Swartz is the second suicide linked to Boston computer crime investigations. Jonathan James, who gained notoriety in January 2000 as a teenager who cracked Department of Defense and NASA systems, shot himself in the head in 2008 after being named as a suspect in Ortiz’s biggest computer crime case, the TJX hacking scam. Over 94 million accounts at retailer TJX were compromised in an attack that was at that time the most extensive yet seen, and James was named as a conspirator. While he denied involvement in the crime, James said he had no confidence in the legal system and shot himself before the case came to court

it never occured to Bloomberg News that the overprotective nature of our lives was what led to this guys death?

(Swartz Suicide Propels Facebook Search for Danger Signs – Bloomberg) Swartz’s death follows a pattern of high-profile suicides within the industry. In 2008, Jonathan James, a hacker who was the first juvenile incarcerated for cybercrime in the U.S., died at age 24. In 2009, Dan Haubert, a co-founder of TicketStumbler, died when he was 25. Gene Kan, the founder of InfraSearch, died in 2002, at age 26. In 2011, Ilya Zhitomirskiy, a co-founder of the social media site Diaspora, died by suicide at age 22.

Facebook Inc. (FB) is helping to open a window into the minds of those who die by suicide.
The social media site is providing researchers at the suicide prevention group SAVE.org a glimpse of how those who take their own lives behave in the days leading up to their deaths, as outlined in their Facebook postings. Dan Reidenberg, executive director of Save and a national leader in the counseling field, expects the information will one day help friends, family and social media sites better identify warning signs in the words and actions that lead up to suicide. It will be a year before they have the data gathered, he said.

Facebook isn’t alone in its efforts. Twitter Inc. and Google Inc. (GOOG) also have put systems in place over the last few years that direct at-risk users to counseling help, or allow others to report concerns to the company.
Twitter itself isn’t conducting research on suicide prevention, said spokesman Jim Prosser in an e-mail. However, an outside researcher or group could conduct a study using Twitter data, he said.
Google’s search engine, meanwhile, has been designed to bring up the phone number for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline for any searches on “suicide” or related terms, said Jay Nancarrow, a spokesman for the Mountain View, California- based company.


Cooperation on cybercrime, maritime security and infrastructure protection, and cooperation on cyber security

January 20, 2013

(Saudi interior minister Prince Mohammed bin Naif. This first cousin of Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal was last noted in this blog for ordering the arrest last month of a Saudi novelist, Turki al Hamad, for tweeting that Islam required a “correction.” Al Hamad now faces the death penalty for apostasy.)
From Al Arabiya: Saudi Arabia and the United States have signed a “Trusted Traveler” agreement to facilitate and accelerate the trusted passenger screening on the principle of reciprocity in both Saudi and U.S. airports. The Saudi state agency reported that Minister of Interior Prince Mohammed bin Naif and U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano “signed an agreement on arrangements relating to the implementation of a program of the ‘Trusted Traveler’ between the two countries.” Interior Minister Prince Mohammed bin Naif and Secretary Napolitano also released a joint statement affirming ongoing cooperation on cybercrime, maritime security and infrastructure protection, and cooperation on cyber security, which is critical to both nations’ economic competitiveness and national security. (Does “cybercrime include “tweeting”?)