Civil war in Egypt

July 28, 2013
(Ahmed Nashar, a Brotherhood spokesman witnessed what happened near the Nasr City mosque where demonstrators built a wall to protect themselves. “When I arrived, bullets were whizzing past my ears,” he told the BBC. “Today was just brutal – people were fired at, with live firearms.”)

Clashes between Muslim Brotherhood and Morsi’s opponents in Tahrir Square

October 12, 2012

CAIRO (AP)Demonstrators throw stones and Molotov cocktails; at least 10 injured according to local activists (Times of Israel) For the first time since Egypt’s new Islamist president took office, his supporters clashed with liberal and leftist protesters in Cairo, storming a stage erected by the opposition activists, smashing loudspeakers and tearing the structure down during competing rallies Friday.
A protester throws a stone after scuffles broke out Friday between groups of several hundred protesters in Cairo's Tahrir square when chants against the new Islamist president angered some in the crowd. (photo credit: AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)The mass demonstration, “Accountability Friday,” was organized by more than 21 political groups against what they claimed was President Mohammed Morsi’s failure to fulfill his promises for social justice and democratic reforms. Clashes erupted between pro-Muslim Brotherhood activists and their opponents.
Demonstrators threw stones and Molotov cocktails into the crowd. The BBC reported on Twitter that its news crew had to leave the scene because “there was so much stone throwing.” Other local activists stated that at least 10 were injured, and that women were fighting with clerics for their right to attend the rally.
The melee between supporters and opponents of Morsi reflects deep political divisions among the country’s 82 million people, more than a year after the popular uprising that toppled Hosni Mubarak.

A protester throws a stone after scuffles broke out Friday between groups of several hundred protesters in Cairo’s Tahrir square when chants against the new Islamist president angered some in the crowd. (photo credit: AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Egyptians are struggling with a plunging economy, deteriorating security and disputes over the writing of the country’s new constitution. They were also stunned by a verdict earlier this week that acquitted 25 Mubarak loyalists on charges of manslaughter and attempted murder during last year’s revolt.
Liberal and leftist groups had called Friday’s protest to demand more action from Morsi after his first 100 days in office. The liberals also want greater diversity on the panel tasked with writing Egypt’s new constitution, which has been packed with Islamists, including members of Morsi’s fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood.
Following calls for the protest, Morsi’s supporters called for a separate rally to demand judicial independence following the acquittals of Mubarak loyalists Wednesday.
The former regime figures were acquitted of organizing the so-called “Camel Battle,” — an incident on Feb. 2, 2011, when assailants on horses and camels charged into crowds in Cairo protesting against Mubarak, leaving nearly a dozen people killed in the assault.
Around 1,000 protesters died across Egypt in the 18-day uprising that toppled Mubarak.
Friday’s melee erupted after Morsi’s supporters stormed the activists’ stage at Cairo’s Tahrir Square, angered by chants from the opposition they perceived as insults to the president.
Protesters were seen with bruises and scrapes as the two camps fought with fists and sticks. Gunshots were also fired.
Meanwhile, Morsi was in Egypt’s second largest city, Alexandria, on Friday, where he pledged that former regime figures would be brought to justice despite Wednesday’s verdicts.
He invoked the “martyrs of the revolution,” including Khaled Said who died at the hands of Mubarak’s police in Alexandria in 2010. Images of Said’s severely disfigured face that had circulated widely online, helped galvanize calls for last year’s uprising that eventually overthrew Mubarak, after nearly 30 years in power.
“All of the segments of Egypt’s society were deprived of many rights” under Mubarak, Morsi told a crowd of supporters. “And the biggest right deprived of us was the right to freedom.”
Following the acquittals of the 24, Morsi on Thursday dismissed the country’s prosecutor general — a Mubarak appointee — in a bid to calm widespread anger. However, the prosecutor, Abdel-Maguid Mahmoud, refused to step down and vowed to remain in his post in defiance of Morsi citing a law that protects the prosecutor general from being ousted by the president.
Mubarak is serving a life sentence along with this longtime interior minister for failing to stop the killing of protesters last year.
After the clashes in Tahrir Square, the April 6 Movement, which played a significant role in bringing down Mubarak, said its supporters would march to the prosecutor’s office and protest there instead.
Caught in the scuffles, Ashraf al-Said said he tried to calm both sides but instead found himself doused in white paint thrown onto the crowd.
“I am here with the revolution, the people and Egypt. I am not with anyone side,” he said, his hands and hair dripping with white paint. “What we are doing now is a sin.”


Women protesting sexual harassment in Egypt get sexually harassed

June 11, 2012

(EOZ)there has been an increase in the already high amount of sexual harassment in Egypt against women, especially during protests. Women got fed up and held their own protest on Friday in Tahrir Square. Guess what happened to them?

A mob of hundreds of men have assaulted women holding a march demanding an end to sexual harassment, with the attackers overwhelming the male guardians and groping and molesting several of the female marchers in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.

The attack follows smaller scale assaults on women this week in Tahrir, the epicenter of the uprising that forced Hosni Mubarak to step down last year. Thousands have been gathering in the square this week in protests over a variety of issues — mainly over worries that presidential elections this month will secure the continued rule by elements of Mubarak’s regime backed by the ruling military.

Friday’s march was called to demand an end to sexual assaults. Around 50 women participated, surrounded by a larger group of male supporters who joined hands to form a protective ring around them. The protesters carried posters saying, “The people want to cut the hand of the sexual harasser,” and chanted, “The Egyptian girl says it loudly, harassment is barbaric.”

After the marchers entered a crowded corner of the square, a group of men waded into the group of women, heckling them and groping them. The male supporters tried to fend them off, and it turned into a melee involving a mob of hundreds.

The marchers tried to flee while the attackers chased them and male supporters tried to protect them. But the attackers persisted, cornering several women against a metal sidewalk railing, including an Associated Press reporter, shoving their hands down their clothes and trying to grab their bags. The male supporters fought back, swinging belts and fists and throwing water.

Eventually, the women were able to reach refuge in a nearby building with the mob still outside until they finally got out to safety.

“After what I saw and heard today. I am furious at so many things. Why beat a girl and strip her off? Why?” wrote Sally Zohney, one of the organisers of the event on Twitter.

The persistence of the attack raised the belief of many that it was intentional, though who orchestrated it was unclear.

Amnesty called for an investigation.

“These women stood up to demand an end to sexual harassment. What they got was intimidation and sexual assault,” said Amnesty International’s Deputy Director for the Middle East and North Africa, Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui, in a statement.

“In last year’s protests, Tahrir Square was a place where women stood on an equal footing with men to demand their freedom. Now it has become a place where women are singled out for sexual harassment.

“These attacks need to be investigated immediately and those found responsible held to account. An investigation would serve as a deterrent against sexual harassment and will help protect women protesters who are exercising their right to peacefully express their views.”

Notably, the protest was organized by 20 Egyptian women’s groups – yet only 50 women showed up, which might indicate that most Egyptian women knew something like this would occur.


Sexual assaults on women in Tahrir Square increasing

June 8, 2012

(EOZ) Today_there_is_a mass demonstration of thousands in Tahrir Square in Cairo against what many Egyptians felt was a light sentence for Hosni Mubarak in his trial.
The women in the protest better watch out.
From AP:

Her screams were not drowned out by the clamor of the crazed mob of nearly 200 men around her.
An endless number of hands reached toward the woman in the red shirt in an assault scene that lasted less than 15 minutes but felt more like an hour.
She was pushed by the sea of men for about a block into a side street from Tahrir Square. Many of the men were trying to break up the frenzy, but it was impossible to tell who was helping and who was assaulting.
Pushed against the wall, the unknown woman’s head finally disappeared. Her screams grew fainter, then stopped. Her slender tall frame had clearly given way. She apparently had passed out. The helping hands finally splashed the attackers with bottles of water to chase them away.
The assault late Tuesday was witnessed by an Associated Press reporter who was almost overwhelmed by the crowd herself and had to be pulled to safety by men who ferried her out of the melee in an open Jeep.
Reports of assaults on women in Tahrir, the epicentre of the uprising that forced Hosni Mubarak to step down last year, have been on the rise with a new round of mass protests to denounce a mixed verdict against the ousted leader and his sons in a trial last week.
No official numbers exist for attacks on women in the square because police do not go near the area, and women rarely report such incidents.
But activists and protesters have reported a number of particularly violent assaults on women in the past week. Many suspect such assaults are organised by opponents of the protests to weaken the spirit of the protesters and drive people away.
Mahmoud said two of his female friends were cornered Monday and pushed into a small passageway by a group of men in the same area where the woman in the red shirt was assaulted.
One was groped while the other was seriously assaulted, Mahmoud said, refusing to divulge specifics other than to insist she wasn’t raped.
Mona Seif, a well-known activist who has been trying to promote awareness about the problem, said Wednesday she was told about three different incidents in the past five days, including two that were violent.
In one incident, the attackers ripped the woman’s clothes off and trampled on her companions, she said.
Women, who participated in the 18-day uprising that ended with Mubarak’s 11 February 2011 ouster as leading activists, protesters, medics and even fighters to ward off attacks by security agents or affiliated thugs on Tahrir, have found themselves facing the same groping and assaults that have long plagued Egypt’s streets during subsequent protests in the square.
Women also have been targeted in recent crackdowns on protesters by military and security troops, a practice commonly used by Mubarak security that grew even more aggressive in the days following his ouster.
In a defining image of the post-Mubarak state violence against women, troops were captured on video stomping with their boots on the bare chest of a woman, with only her blue bra showing, as other troops pulled her by the arms across the ground.
A 2008 report by the Egyptian Center for Women’s Rights says two-thirds of women in Egypt experienced sexual harassment on a daily basis.

It isn’t only political protests that have men attacking women. They do it on religious holidays, too.
And if you think that women who cover their bodies and hair are less likely to be attacked, think again.
The article does say that some Egyptians are fed up, and organizing patrols to protect women in Tahrir Square.

…But America’s Secretary of State is worried about the lives of Israeli women… why? It’s political.
America and Israel has differences recognized by our courts, but gender difference helps respect women. Feminism does not respect women. Feminism oppresses equivalently.


Harvard Sex Week

March 25, 2012

Harvard Never Learns (Legal Insurrection) Sex-Positivity and Slut-Pride: Sex Tips for a Modern World from Good Vibrations: Join HLSRJ and Good Vibrations for a short discussion of sex-positivity, a demo of lube and some popular sex toys, then Q&A. Free Food!

As if the one state solution event that didn’t invite any Zionist groups for a Jewish one state were not biased as is. I suppose the sluts are now preparing to blow Hamas and Fatah together.

(Palestine Today) and (Challah) reports that Egypt has said that Fatah and Hamas are both “fully responsible” for the failure of reconciliation. An Egyptian official said that the two movements have “failed completely” in the implementation of the Cairo Agreement and the Doha Declaration. The official also said that the two factions have made things more complex and have moved further away from a solution. The same official said that the bickering between Hamas and Fatah undermined all the efforts to complete the reconciliation process and form a unity government. According to the official, if Fatah and Hamas continue to bicker (they have) then Egypt will be forced to stop hosting reconciliation meetings in Cairo.

Makes it more dramatic… the slutty vaginas indoctrinated in arrogance are excited already… I mean what is a bunch of feminists hanging out with out terrorists to make things interesting so that they can blame the plight of women on Jews and Western civilization, but somehow I think the marriage will work out like the marriage of Fatah and Hamas. I guess gay marriage really is like straight marriage. Oh well… you always can rape a college educated liberal in Tahrir Square. Where is Gloria Steinem and Jane Fonda when that happens?

Egypt’s Islamist Parties Claim Victory #israelnationalnews

December 19, 2011
jihad(the current administration has a stake in referring to the Muslim Brotherhood as “moderate” and “largely secular,”)
Egypt’s two leading Islamist parties said on Sunday their parties have secured about three-quarters of votes cast in the second round of a parliamentary election, Reuters reported.
A source from the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) told Reuters the party was on track to win about 40 percent of votes for party lists, based on results from most districts.
Meanwhile, a spokesman for the ultra-conservative Salafi al-Nour Party told the news agency its list received about 35 percent of votes.
The second round of the voting in Egypt was held last Thursday in Giza, Luxor, Aswan and Ismaila.
In last month’s first poll, the Muslim Brotherhood claimed victory, winning about 40 percent of the ballots.
The once-outlawed Islamists’ Freedom and Justice party had won 34 seats in runoff elections, while Al Nour garnered another five seats, according to the group’s website.
While an official breakdown of results for the list vote has yet to be announced, Reuters noted that both parties’ predictions after the first round were broadly accurate.
The FJP source was quoted as having said the 40 percent estimate was based on counting completed in 11 of the 15 second-round constituencies where seats will be allocated by party lists.
The Muslim Brotherhood distanced itself from Al Nour after the first round, saying it is “a moderate and fair party.”
Al Nour advocates for a strict interpretation of Sharia, where the sexes are segregated and women must be veiled and are barred from driving.
Meanwhile on Sunday, Egyptians entered a third day of deadly clashes between protesters and government forces on a street close to Cairo’s Tahrir Square.
At least 10 people have been killed and more than 440 people have been injured so far, according to Egyptian Health Ministry figures cited by the Associated Press, as protesters continue to demand the military hand over power to a civilian authority.
The clashes began late Thursday after military police stormed a sit-in camp that the protesters have held outside the Cabinet building for the past three weeks.

whoopy!


The brave women of the Middle East: Female protesters brutally beaten with metal poles as vicious soldiers drag girls through streets by their hair in day of shame | Mail Online

December 18, 2011

Oh, but wait it’s the Jewish men that are the problem. The guys that don’t like to lose their jobs because they dislike the Androgyny being pushed on them. Feminism ignores what is going on in the third world like usual.

After being viciously beaten by a 10-strong mob of Egyptian male soldiers, this woman lies helplessly on the ground as her shirt is ripped from her body and a man kicks her with full force in her exposed chest.
Moments earlier she had been struck countless times in the head and body with metal batons, not content with the brutal beating delivered by his fellow soldier, one man stamped on her head repeatedly.
She feebly tried to shield her head from the relentless blows with her hands.

Brutal: Egyptian army soldiers drag this woman on the ground and kick her in the chest

Brutal: This shocking image shows Egyptian army soldiers dragging this helpless woman on the ground and kicking her hard in the chest after ripping her clothes from her body
Outnumbered: This woman screams in pain as she is surrounded by five male soldiers during protests in the Egyptian capital and beaten with poles

Outnumbered: This woman screams in pain as she is surrounded by five male soldiers during protests in the Egyptian capital and beaten with poles

But she was knocked unconscious in the shameful attack and left lying motionless as the military men mindlessly continued to beat her limp and half-naked body.

Before she was set upon by the guards, three men appeared to carry her as they tried to flee the approaching military.
But they were too slow and the soldiers caught up with them, capturing the women and knocking one of the men to the ground.
The two other men were forced to abandoned their fellow protestors and continued running, looking helplessly back at the two they left behind being relentlessly attacked as they lay on the ground.

…but hey Gloria Steinem says it’s the White man’s fault.

This is just one of the hundreds of shameful injustices seen in Cairo’s Tahrir Square where Egypt’s military took a dramatically heavy hand on Saturday to crush protests against its rule.
Aya Emad told the AP that troops dragged her by her headscarf and hair into the Cabinet headquarters. The 24-year-old said soldiers kicked her on the ground, an officer shocked her with an electrical prod and another slapped her on the face, leaving her nose broken and her arm in a sling.
Mona Seif, an activist who was briefly detained Friday, said she saw an officer repeatedly slapping a detained old woman in the face.
‘It was a humiliating scene,’ Seif told the private TV network Al-Nahar. ‘I have never seen this in my life.’

Brutally injured: More than 50 men and women were injured on Saturday in violent clashes between rock-throwing protesters and military police

Brutally injured: This woman is left barely conscious and splattered in blood after being beaten the military in violent clashes between rock-throwing protesters and military police
Violent: Egyptian army soldiers use brutal force to arrest this female protester and drag her by her hair during clashes with military police near Cairo's Tahrir Square

Shameless: Egyptian army soldiers use brutal force to arrest this female protester and drag her by her hair during clashes with military police near Cairo’s Tahrir Square
Shameless: The heavy handed Egyptian army soldiers drag the arrested a woman protester off by her hair

Violent: The heavy handed Egyptian army soldiers drag the arrested a woman protester off by her hair

In Bahrain a similar pictured was emerging with a video clip showing a female human rights activist being hit by a policewoman during clashes between police and anti-government protestors.
Police fired teargas to break up a demonstration by several hundred people on the outskirts of the capital, Manama where several women staged a sit-in protest trying to block a main road.
After nearly 48 hours of continuous fighting in Egypt’s capital more than 300 were left injured and nine dead, many of them shot dead.
The most sustained crackdown yet is likely a sign that the generals who took power after the February ouster of Hosni Mubarak are confident that the Egyptian public is on its side after two rounds of widely acclaimed parliament elections, that Islamist parties winning the vote will stay out of the fight while pro-democracy protesters become more isolated.
Still, the generals risk turning more Egyptians against them, especially from outrage over the abuse of women.

‘Do they think this is manly?’ Toqa Nosseir, a 19-year old student, said of the attacks on women. ‘Where is the dignity?’
Man-handled: Egyptian soldiers clash with this female protester and two male protestors near Cairo's Tahrir Square

Man-handled: Egyptian soldiers clash with this female protester and two male protestors near Cairo’s Tahrir Square
Protection: A female and two male Egyptian protester use a metal sheet as a shield as they throw rocks at military police, unseen, behind the gates and inside the Parliament building near Cairo's Tahrir Square

Protection: A female and two male Egyptian protester use a metal sheet as a shield as they throw rocks at military police, unseen, behind the gates and inside the Parliament building near Cairo’s Tahrir Square
Brave: Two women join protesters as they shout anti-military council slogans near the cabinet in Cairo

Brave: Two women join protesters as they shout anti-military council slogans near the cabinet in Cairo

Nosseir joined the protest over her parents’ objections because she couldn’t tolerate the clashes she had seen.
‘No one can approve or accept what is happening here,’ she said.
‘The military council wants to silence all criticism. They want to hold on power … I will not accept this humiliation just for the sake of stability.’
Nearby in Tahrir, protesters held up newspapers with the image of the half-stripped woman on the front page to passing cars, shouting sarcastically, ‘This is the army that is protecting us!’
‘No one can approve or accept what is happening here,’ she said.
‘The military council wants to silence all criticism. They want to hold on power … I will not accept this humiliation just for the sake of stability.’
Nearby in Tahrir, protesters held up newspapers with the image of the half-stripped woman on the front page to passing cars, shouting sarcastically, ‘This is the army that is protecting us!’

Grief: A woman mourns slain Egyptian protesters who were killed during the latest clashes with Egyptian soldiers, while they wait to receive their bodies in front of the morgue in Cairo

Grief: A woman mourns slain Egyptian protesters who were killed during the latest clashes with Egyptian soldiers, while they wait to receive their bodies in front of the morgue in Cairo

Under-fire: Pro-reform female protesters run for cover as heavy-handed police try to disperse them with tear-gas, in Abu Seba village, north of Manama, Bahrain

Under-fire: Pro-reform female protesters run for cover as heavy-handed police try to disperse them with tear-gas, in Abu Seba village, north of Manama, Bahrain

‘Are you not ashamed?’ leading reform figure and Nobel Peace laureate Mohamed ElBaradei posted on Twitter in an address to the ruling military council.
Egypt’s new, military-appointed interim prime minister defended the military, denying it shot protesters. He said gunshot deaths were caused by other attackers he didn’t identify.
He accused the protesters of being ‘anti-revolution.’
The main street between Tahrir Square, the epicenter of the anti-Mubarak protests, and the parliament and Cabinet buildings where the clashes began early the previous morning looked like a war zone on Saturday.
Military police on rooftops pelting protesters below with stones and firebombs and launched truncheon-swinging assaults to drive the crowds back.
Young activists put helmets or buckets on their heads or grabbed sheets of concrete and even satellite dishes as protection against the stones hailing down from the roofs.
The streets were strewn with chunks of concrete, stones ,broken glass, burned furniture and peddlers’ carts as clashes continued to rage after nightfall Saturday.

Detained: Activist Zainab al-Khawaja (Right) screams while being arrested during a protest in Abu Seba village, north of Manama

Detained: Activist Zainab al-Khawaja (Right) screams while being arrested during a protest in Abu Seba village, north of Manama
Heavy-handed: A Bahraini policewoman drags activist Zainab al-Khawaja across the floor after arresting her fo taking part in sit-in protest

Heavy-handed: A Bahraini policewoman drags activist Zainab al-Khawaja across the floor after arresting her fo taking part in sit-in protest

The clashes began early on Friday with a military assault on a 3-week-old sit-in outside the Cabinet building by protesters demanding the military hand over power immediately to civilians.
More than a week of heavy fighting erupted in November, leaving more than 40 dead – but that was largely between police and protesters, with the military keeping a low profile.
In the afternoon, military police charged into Tahrir, swinging truncheons and long sticks, briefly chasing out protesters and setting fire to their tents.
They trashed a field hospital set up by protesters, swept into buildings where television crews were filming and briefly detained journalists. They tossed the camera and equipment of an Al-Jazeera TV crew off the balcony of a building.
A journalist who was briefly detained told The Associated Press that he was beaten up with sticks and fists while being led to into the parliament building. Inside, he saw a group of detained young men and one woman.
Each was surrounded by six or seven soldiers beating him or her with sticks or steel bars or giving electrical shocks with prods.
‘Blood covered the floor, and an officer was telling the soldiers to wipe the blood,’ said the journalist

Defiant: A brave woman shouts anti-government slogans as she stands amidst tear gas fired by riot police to disperse a sit-in at a roundabout on Budaiya Highway, west of Manama

Defiant: A brave woman shouts anti-government slogans as she stands amidst tear gas fired by riot police to disperse a sit-in at a roundabout on Budaiya Highway, west of Manama

As night fell in Tahrir, clashes continued around a concrete wall that the military erected to block the avenue from Tahrir to parliament.
In Bahrain, Zainab al-Khawaja, 27, was arrested and dragged across the floor by her handcuffs after police fired teargas to break up a demonstration by several hundred people on the outskirts of the capital, Manama.
Ms al-Khawaja and several other women staged a sit-in protest trying to block a main road. The other women fled the scene but Ms al-Khawaja refused.
Riot police fired tear-gas at the women, with dozens requiring hospital treatment after the incident.
A report by a panel of human rights experts in November found that Bahraini security forces had used excessive forces and carried out the systematic abuse of prisoners, including torture, when the regime sent in troops to crush the uprising in March. 
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