I am Chelsea Manning

August 23, 2013

Manning wrote in a statement read on the Today show”Given the way that I feel, and have felt since childhood, I want to begin hormone therapy as soon as possible. I hope that you will support me in this transition. I also request that, starting today, you refer to me by my new name and use the feminine pronoun (except in official mail to the confinement facility).”


Video – Michael Hastings Cremated Without Family Permission; Wife Hires Private Investigator.

July 18, 2013

(MFS – The Other News)(Video – Michael Hastings Cremated Without Family Permission; Wife Hires Private Investigator.HT: InfiniteUnknown.)
Michael Hastings’ Ashes Sent Home for Burial (San Diego 6, July 14/15, 2013):
Details uncovered by this reporter shed new light into the June 18 death of journalist Michael Hastings.
Hastings’ friend and confidant SSgt. Joe Biggs disclosed a macabre twist in the award-winning journalist’s death in a suspicious single-car accident. According to SSgt. Biggs, “Michael Hastings’ body was returned to Vermont in an urn.” He further alleged, “Family members did not want Michael’s body cremated.”
This revelation provides another wrinkle in the Los Angeles Police Department’s (LAPD) handling of a case they labeled “no foul play” only hours after the writer’s death.
Nevertheless LA County assistant corner, Ed Winter, said it took two days to identify the burned-beyond recognition body of Hastings. Officials also confirmed that an autopsy has been performed, but the cause of death is still pending. Unfortunately the family will have to wait for cause of death answers as LAPD media spokesperson Lieutenant Andrew Neiman indicated, “It will take several weeks to get the toxicology results.”
SSgt. Biggs also emphatically stated that liquor was not a factor in the accident, as Hastings hadn’t consumed alcoholic beverages in five years.
So why is the LAPD delaying the reports?
It was SSgt. Biggs who released the following chilling email to members of the media; “Subject: FBI Investigation, re: NSA -Hey (redacted names) — the Feds are interviewing my “close friends and associates.” Perhaps if the authorities arrive “BuzzFeed GQ,” er HQ, may be wise to immediately request legal counsel before any conversations or interviews about our news gathering practices or related journalism issues. Also: I’m onto a big story, and need to go off the rada[r] for a bit. All the best, and hope to see you all soon. Michael”
The receipt of this email from Hastings tipped the scales for SSgt. Biggs. “This wasn’t an accident and I will continue to investigate his death.”
As an investigative journalist, Hastings saw his fair share of threats. One particular passage in Hastings book, “The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of America’s War in Afghanistan,” revealed that a former McChrystal staff member made a death threat. “We’ll hunt you down and kill you if we don’t like what you write,” the unnamed staffer said. Hastings coolly retorted: “Well, I get death threats like that about once a year, so no worries.”

Despite the LAPD’s categorization of the Hasting fatal accident as a “no (evidence of) foul play,” LAPD continues to ignore FOIA (CPRA in Calif.) requests made by San Diego 6 News for the police report, 9/11 call, autopsy, bomb squad and toxicology reports, or make the Mercedes available for inspection which only fuels conjecture.)


Michael Hastings #MediaBurnOut: #Wikileaks claims #NSA conspiracy

June 20, 2013

Hastings, who covered the 2008 presidential election for Newsweek, was hired by Buzzfeed last spring to cover President Barack Obama’s 2012 re-election campaign

Michael Hastings contacted WikiLeaks lawyer Jennifer Robinson just a few hours before he died, saying that the FBI was investigating him.

Manning’s Sexual Orientation Is Raised At Hearing : NPR

December 18, 2011

Manning’s lawyers claiming gender identity disorder compromised his judgement. LOLZ… I just love the LEFT and NPR sometimes… so Homosexuality is a disorder?!
If I said this… what would happen?

(npr.org) FORT MEADE, Md. (AP) — The young Army intelligence specialist accused of leaking government secrets spent his 24th birthday in court Saturday as his lawyers argued his status as a gay soldier before the repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell” played an important role in his actions.

Lawyers for Pfc. Bradley Manning began laying out a defense to show that his struggles in an environment hostile to homosexuality contributed to mental and emotional problems that should have barred him from having access to sensitive material.
Manning is accused of leaking hundreds of thousands of sensitive items to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks, including Iraq and Afghanistan war logs, State Department cables and a military video of a 2007 American helicopter attack in Iraq that killed 11 men, including a Reuters news photographer and his driver.
Prosecutors at the pretrial hearing in a small courtroom on an Army post outside Washington began trying to connect Manning to the publication of that material by WikiLeaks. On Saturday, they presented six of about 20 witnesses they plan to call during the hearing being held to determine whether Manning will be court-martialed on 22 counts, including aiding the enemy.
Testimony included the first references since the hearing began Friday to Adrian Lamo, a former hacker to whom Manning allegedly confessed his ties to WikiLeaks. The basis for the charges Manning faces are transcripts of a series of online chats with Lamo.
The Obama administration says the released information has threatened valuable military and diplomatic sources and strained America’s relations with other governments. Manning’s lawyers counter that much of the information that was classified by the Pentagon posed no risk.
Army criminal investigators described evidence they collected that links Manning to the WikiLeaks website’s collection of U.S. military and diplomatic secrets.
But among the first issues to arise Saturday was whether Manning’s sexual orientation is relevant to the case against him. The defense revealed that Manning had written to one of his supervisors in Baghdad before his arrest, saying he was suffering from gender-identity disorder. He included a picture of himself dressed as a woman and talked about how it was affecting his ability to do his job and even think clearly.
Maj. Matthew Kemkes, a defense lawyer, asked Special Agent Toni Graham, an Army criminal investigator, whether she had talked to people who believed Manning was gay or found evidence among his belongings relating to gender-identity disorder. The condition often is described as a mental diagnosis in which people believe they were born the wrong sex.
Graham said such questions were irrelevant to the investigation. “We already knew before we arrived that Pfc. Manning was a homosexual,” Graham said.
Prosecutors objected several times to the questions. Kemkes responded that if the government can argue that Manning intended to leak secrets, “what is going on in my client’s mind is very important.”
During cross -examination of Treasury Department Special Agent Troy Bettencourt, who investigated the case, defense attorney Capt. Paul Bouchard asked him he was aware during his investigation that Manning was gay. “Yes, sir,” Bettencourrt said.
Bouchard asked Bettencourt if he believes Manning’s military leaders failed him, given his behavior such as overturning a table and throwing a chair in episodes of rage. Bettencourt said that in hindsight, “I would like to think that had I been in the chain of command, I would have maybe done things differently. I would have been aware of everything we now know to prevent him from deploying — but that is with the benefit of hindsight.”
Prosecutor Capt. Joe Morrow quickly asked Bettencourt if he believes people who have signed nondisclosure agreements, like Manning, “have an individual responsibility to safeguard classified information.” Bettencourt replied, “Yes.”
One of Manning’s commanders in Baghdad, Capt. Steven Lim, said Manning should have had his security clearance suspended because of his problems. Lim said the outbursts occurred before he arrived, and that when he learned of them after Manning’s arrest, he was shocked. Lim said he was also unaware that Manning believed he was suffering from gender-identity disorder.
A former platoon sergeant testified that Manning knew from training he shouldn’t give classified information to people not authorized to have it. That witness, now retired Sgt. First Class Brian Madrid, said by phone from Arizona that he also had to give Manning “corrective training” in 2008 after Manning prepared a video for his family of himself talking about his daily life.
Madrid said Manning had used words in the video like “top secret” and “classified.” And while he didn’t reveal any secrets, those words could identify him as a person with a high-level security clearance and make him a target of those would want to compromise him.
During its cross examination of Graham, the Army criminal investigator, Manning’s defense team also sought to convince the court that not all of the material he is accused of leaking is classified.
Graham, who collected evidence from Manning’s living quarters and workplace, testified that among the items seized was a DVD marked “secret” that contained a military video showing the 2007 incident in which Apache attack helicopters gunned down unarmed men in Iraq.
The video was taken from the cockpit of one the helicopters. WikiLeaks posted the video in April 2010, sparking questions about the military’s rules of engagement and whether more needed to be done to prevent civilian casualties. The gunners can be heard laughing and referring to the men as “dead bastards.”
Kemkes asked Graham whether she knew the video was unclassified. She said she didn’t. “In fact, it was an unclassified video,” Kemkes said.
At the time the video was posted by WikiLeaks, the Pentagon called it a breach of national security and it was believed to be secret.
Although WikiLeaks had been posting sensitive information to the Web since 2006, release of the Apache video drew worldwide attention to the organization as it prepared to publish secret documents on the war in Afghanistan.
Manning’s appearances Friday and Saturday in the Fort Meade courtroom mark the first time he has been seen in public after 19 months in detention. The Oklahoma native comes to court in Army camouflage fatigues and wearing dark-rimmed glasses. Manning sat calmly in the courtroom Saturday without appearing to react to the testimony, even when centered on his troubled mental state and homosexuality. Manning listened intently and regularly took notes.
An Army appeals court on Friday rejected a defense effort to have the presiding officer, Lt. Col. Paul Almanza, because of alleged bias. Separately, lawyers for WikiLeaks and founder Julian Assange are asking the military’s highest appeals court to guarantee two seats in the Fort Meade courtroom.
Manning’s hearing is open to the public, with limited seating. Inside the courtroom, no civilian recording equipment is allowed. Instead of a judge, a presiding officer delivers a recommendation as to whether prosecutors have enough evidence to bring a suspect to trial. A military commander then makes the final decision.
The case has spawned an international support network of people who believe the U.S. government has gone too far in seeking to punish Manning.
More than 100 people gathered outside Fort Meade for a march in support of Manning, some holding signs declaring “Americans have the right to know. Free Bradley Manning” and “Blowing the whistle on war crimes is not a crime.”
Todd Anderson, 64, said he drove from New York City to take part. “I think this man showed a great deal of courage, the kind of thing I wouldn’t have the courage to do, and I really consider him to be a hero,” Anderson said.
Juline Jordan, 46, said she flew in from Detroit just for the day. “I support what he did because he exposed some horrific war crimes and horrific things done at the hands of the United States government and the Department of Defense, and he’s a hero for that,” Jordan said.
In London, several dozen protesters from gay organizations, the Occupy London protest camp and other groups rallied outside the U.S. Embassy Saturday calling for Manning’s release and offering birthday wishes.
__
Associated Press writers Jill Lawless in London, Richard Lardner and Mark Sherman in Washington and Brian Witte at Fort Meade contributed to this report.

wait… so if I said in public what Manning’s lawyers are claiming… then what? but this is just like… Don’t Ask Don’t Tell. The lawyers are winking to their liberal colleagues. They all know this is bullshit and if any American said this he would lose his job… especially in a Blue State. This is why I hate the left

FORT MEADE, MD (Manning showed warning signs before WikiLeak | Reuters) – Bradley Manning, the suspected source of the largest leak of classified U.S. documents in history, displayed warning signs of emotional instability before his alleged wrongdoing and struggled with his gender identity, his attorney said on Saturday.

Manning was a U.S. Army intelligence analyst in Iraq when he is alleged to have illegally downloaded massive data files from the military’s classified network and became a source for anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks.

On the second-day of pre-trial hearings that coincided with Manning’s 24th birthday, his defense team appeared to suggest the troubled young man shouldn’t have had access to classified documents, given his emotional state, as it cross-examined prosecution witnesses.

Details emerged in the courtroom about incidents including one occasion when Manning “got furious and upset, flipped a table during the outburst” and sent a computer crashing to the ground, according to Manning’s attorney, David Coombs. He had to be restrained over fears he was headed for a weapon.

Another time, Manning was found curled up in a ball.

Still, Coombs pointed out that access to the military’s classified network was granted widely throughout America’s armed forces and Manning’s access was never revoked.

“If you were told this behavior, would you consider it a minor incident?” Coombs asked Army Captain Steven Lim, who oversaw the work of the team of analysts Manning belonged to.

“Probably not,” Lim answered. He later added that the outburst, if pursued further, could have resulted in the immediate removal of Manning’s access to sensitive files.

U.S. officials say WikiLeaks’ successive data dumps last year, including diplomatic cables, endangered national security and Manning faces charges including aiding the enemy which could send him to prison for life.

Manning, wearing military fatigues and dark-rimmed glasses, was led into the courtroom at Fort Meade, Maryland, uncuffed. He listened intently as prosecutors attempted to show they had enough evidence to go to trial under a general court marshal.

That evidence included chat logs in which Manning appears to disclose his activities to former hacker Adrian Lamo, who turned the intelligence analyst in to authorities, triggering the U.S. military investigation in May, 2010.

In Internet chats with Lamo, Manning said he would bring in CDs and load them with downloaded data from the military’s Secret Internet Protocol Router Network, known as SIPRNet, Lamo told Reuters in a previous interview.

GENDER IDENTITY

Even as prosecution witnesses laid out the case against Manning, the defense appeared to sidestep the question of whether he was to blame for the leaks. It appeared focused instead on Manning’s mental state.

Beyond emotional instability, Coombs also flagged Manning’s concerns – which he said were communicated to a superior officer – that his gender identity was seriously affecting his life, work and ability to think.

Manning, it was disclosed during the proceedings, created a female alter-ego online, Breanna Manning.

At the time the files were leaked, being openly gay was prohibited in the U.S. military under the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy, a ban which was scrapped earlier this year.

Special Agent Toni Graham, with the Army Criminal Investigation Division of the Military Police, told the court she had found a folder with printed materials related to gender identity, but disregarded them as irrelevant to the leak investigation.

“We already knew that Pfc Manning was a homosexual. … We knew he was interested in those topics,” she said, adding that he also had a “very limited” number of friends.

Manning was quiet during Saturday’s proceedings, occasionally taking notes or twirling a pen in his hands. He sometimes turned to speak softly to his attorneys but did not address the court.

In his Web chats with Lamo, Manning appeared to acknowledge giving materials to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

He wrote to Lamo: “I’m a high profile source … and I’ve developed a relationship with Assange,” according to details of the chats confirmed by Lamo to Reuters.

The Justice Department is investigating Assange and one of his attorneys, Jennifer Robinson, was in the courtroom Saturday.

Assange is in Britain fighting extradition to Sweden over accusations of rape and sexual assault made by two female former WikiLeaks volunteers in August 2010. Britain’s Supreme Court said on Friday it had granted permission for Assange to appeal his case.

he’s a folk hero to many. and frankly…they have good reason. don’t ask don’t tell was wrong. it was lies. I was against it and I’m against Gays in military combat. sooner or later the progressive need someone to look them square in the eye and say no. I’m not a Gay basher. I don’t think it is an illness. I think it is part of human nature… something that happens either because of experience or sometimes something some people are born with. They offer many positive contributions to society… and that is obvious by the way this guy wasn’t fired to begin with. Gay people are hard workers, but the military isn’t just about working hard and being witty. People have the right to say… hey… I like my Gay stylist, but I don’t want classified military information in their hands. BTW… I wouldn’t last long in the military either… and if I tried I would hope people would love me enough to tell me that I’m not right for the job. There are people who just are not right for following orders. I would never have myself in this position either.


The “Day of Rage” at Wall Street

September 20, 2011
The New York Times reports that the months-in-planning “Day of Rage” that the hacker group Anonymous sponsored in New York City in the financial district kind of sputtered out when protesters discovered their access to parts of Wall Street was denied by police officers who beat them to the area; By 10 a.m., metal barricades manned by police officers ringed the blocks of Wall Street between Broadway and William Street to the east. (In a statement, Paul J. Browne, the Police Department’s chief spokesman said, “A protest area was established on Broad Street at Exchange Street, next to the stock exchange, but protesters elected not to use it.”) Organizers, promoters and supporters called the day, which had been widely discussed on Twitter and other social media sites, simply September 17. Some referred to it as the United States Day of Rage, an apparent reference to a series of disruptive protests against the Vietnam War held in Chicago in 1969. The idea, according to some organizers, was to camp out for weeks or even months to replicate the kind, if not the scale, of protests that erupted earlier this year in places as varied as Egypt, Spain and Israel.(MORE HELL?NYC WallStreet Protests and Another Day of Rage

Bradley Manning May Face Death Penalty

March 3, 2011

THE GUARDIAN: ‘Aiding the enemy’ among 22 new charges brought against US soldier held in solitary confinement
Bradley Manning, the US soldier who has spent 10 months in solitary confinement on suspicion of having transmitted a huge trove of state secrets to WikiLeaks, now faces a possible death penalty.
The intelligence specialist, who is being held in the maximum security jail on Quantico marine base in Virginia, has been handed 22 additional military charges as part of his court martial process.
They come on top of initial charges of having illegally obtained 150,000 secret US government cables and handing more than 50 of them to an unauthorised person that carried a possible sentence of up to 52 years in prison.
Manning’s lawyer, David Coombs, said that the most serious of the new charges was the Article 104 offence of “aiding the enemy”. The charge carries a potential death sentence. >>> Ed Pilkington in New York | Thursday, March 03, 2011


Deadly Fictions – The classified diplomatic cables published by Wikileaks are the Pentagon Papers of the pro-Israel right – by Lee Smith

December 1, 2010
When Hillary Clinton and Obama plaid Poker with Israel, along came the WikiLeak. the hypocrisy is glaring. America was spying on it’s ally and I doubt we will see Roger Cohen owe up that the Arab states are terrified of Iran. Free Jonathan Pollard now! America should do the right thing. 

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has positioned himself as a left-wing whistleblower whose life mission is to call the United States to task for the evil it has wreaked throughout the world. But after poring through the diplomatic cables revealed via the site yesterday, one might easily wonder if Assange isn’t instead a clandestine agent of Dick Cheney and Bibi Netanyahu; whether his muckraking website isn’t part of a Likudnik plot to provoke an attack on Iran; and if PFC Bradley Manning, who allegedly uploaded 250,000 classified documents to Wikileaks, is actually a Lee Harvey Oswald-like neocon patsy.
With all due apologies to Oliver Stone (and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of Iran and Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey), what the Wikileaks documents reveal is not a conspiracy of any kind but a scary and growing gap between the private assessments of American diplomats and allies in the Middle East and public statements made by U.S. government officials. The publication of these leaked cables is eerily reminiscent of the Pentagon Papers, which exposed a decade-long attempt by U.S. officials to distort and conceal unpalatable truths about the Vietnam War, and manipulate public opinion. The difference is that while the Pentagon Papers substantially vindicated the American left, the Wikileaks cable dump vindicates the right.

Here are eight of the most obvious examples from the initial trove of documents that has appeared online: the rest of the exposure via tabletmag.com

some commentators like at the news hour by Soros funded PBS had it’s regular Israel bashing analysis… (and this had me cackling) had ZBIGNIEW BRZEZINSKI allude that Israel or a hostile party to Turkey was behind the Wikileak.  One can easily see that the Wikileak will evolve in the Arab world into another variation of 911Troof.  Too many of Israel’s enemies were really hurt by these cables… and it is very hard to spin that this didn’t help Israel’s survival away from a Holocaust.
 The news that terrorists were using the ambulances in Israel was revealing… but no more as revealing as the responses by the Israel bashing media