Muslim Sexual Grooming Ring Implicated in a Murder And Rape of 60 Teenage Girls

April 9, 2011

Muslims in Derby, England, caught on CCTV approaching teenage girls…Yet more evidence emerging of this sickening practice, committed almost exclusively by by Pakistani Muslim men in the UK, ably abbetted by the press and politicians who cover it up in the name of ‘Community Cohesion’; either by denial, omission, or the use of blame-diffusing weasel words (think ‘Asian’).via undhimmi.com


Deep packet inspection takes off in Asia and the Middle East

March 18, 2011
Protesters in the Middle East

Deep packet inspection technology watches what we do on the web


Internet technologies have played a role in the recent Middle East protests

Why is deep packet inspection technology such a thriving business in the Middle East and Asia? 

The connection has timed out. You are not connected to the Internet. Server not found.
We’ve all experienced one of these dread messages at some point in our digital lives, courtesy of the inner workings of our Web browser. Most of the time they appear because of a problem with the networking hardware and associated software that stands between us and the websites we want to access.
In other cases they may be the result of a deliberate act perpetrated by an Internet service provider – often at the request of a repressive regime intent on blocking the free flow of information.
It happens in China every day, where typing the words ‘Tiananmen Square’ into a search engine will produce either a blank page or a heavily filtered list of results. Beyond these automated content filtering restrictions, there have been reports of Chinese Web users suddenly being unable to access YouTube whenever a video that the government has deemed as seditious is becoming too popular.
Similar experiences have been reported in Iran and in many of the countries in the Middle East that have been pressing for democratic change since the beginning of this year. One key technology that many suspect is being used to carry out such online censorship is deep-packet inspection (DPI).

How it works

The concept behind DPI is simple. Internet traffic consists of a multitude of IP (internet protocol) packets that are exchanged between two computers – a server and an end user. Before packets reach their destination to be reassembled, they must traverse a series of routers and switches that determine the best path for them, based on the information contained in each packet header.
DPI equipment mimics the ‘reading’ function of routers and switches, and can also look into each packet’s payload, which holds the data being exchanged.

Western reticence

Privacy advocates – particularly in North America and Europe – have been vocal about the fact that installing DPI hardware and software may give Internet service providers the ability to monitor all email, Web-based and audiovisual content going through their networks.
Shira Levine, directing analyst for next-generation operational support systems and policy at Infonetics Research, remembers how Virgin Media in the UK was heavily criticised last year after it said it would trial DPI technology to detect copyright infringement among its file-sharing customers.
‘Even that application,’ says Levine, ‘which you certainly couldn’t argue would be a violation of privacy as copyright protection is a legal mandate, created a lot of uproar. There’s been a significant perception in [Western] markets linking DPI with a ‘Big Brother’ technology. I think that’s really limiting operator investment in those countries.’
Privacy concerns are just one of the factors limiting DPI take-up in the Western hemisphere. Another is the net-neutrality debate. When the first DPI systems started to be marketed in the early 2000s, operators used them to perform network traffic optimisation. But since this involved making a number of assumptions about the value of certain types of packets and prioritising traffic accordingly, net-neutrality supporters (and, in some countries, communications regulators) asked for limits on their use.
That’s the end of the matter, then – the DPI industry has no future, right? Well, from a global market worth less than $250m in 2009, sales of standalone DPI gear (which currently account for more than 90 per cent of the market) will surge to $1.5bn by 2014, according to Infonetics.
‘There’s a lot of growth potential in some of the emerging markets,’ says Levine, such as the Middle East and Asia.
So, with Western demand for DPI inhibited, is it the more authoritarian states in the East that are buying the technology to control what residents are able to view on the internet?
Well, it’s one thing to say that governments which censor online content are probably using DPI tools to do so. It’s another to assert that this is driving the strong growth in demand. ‘I don’t see that being a huge driver at the moment,’ says Levine. ‘I’m not ruling it out going forward, though.’

From cyber security to targeted services

So what is driving demand? E&T put that question to Procera Networks, one of the top three suppliers of standalone DPI products, together with Sandvine and Allot.
‘If I look specifically at the Middle East, they’re pretty far along when it comes to service packaging, which is probably why we’re seeing a more rapid increase in that market than in many others,’ says Jon Linden, Procera’s vice president of global marketing.
Levine agrees, and explains what service packaging involves: ‘There’s less of a concern about privacy in those markets. So a lot of operators are looking at combining DPI with their policy and charging-control system to create value-added services – really being able to identify what the subscriber is doing and then turning that [data] into marketing and loyalty opportunities.
‘It’s about understanding and addressing the needs of the subscribers,’ says Dan Joe Barry, vice president of marketing at Napatech, which claims to have developed the most advanced programmable network adapters for traffic analysis and application offloading for wireless broadband operators.
‘There’ll be a period when you’ll have to monitor how they are using their services to build up an idea of what these guys like, what their needs are, how they use their service,’ Barry says. ‘Then, a dialogue can be established where you could say: ‘Look, I know that you use Facebook a lot – would you like a service where Facebook is prioritised so you can get a really good service for that [on your mobile]?”
Another emerging DPI application that Middle Eastern and Asian operators are keen on is lawful interception and cyber-security. ‘There is a need for anti-terrorism and other public security agencies to be able to go in and see what’s going on in the networks,’ says Barry.
‘Consumers have the idea that whatever I send is going to be encapsulated and nobody will be able to see what I’m sending. Well, that’s not going to be the case. And we don’t want it to be the case,’ he says, ‘because we want to be able to protect the network.’
Levine adds that some countries have specific government mandates that require communications providers to be able to filter or block traffic: ‘In some parts of Asia, for example, Skype traffic is blocked. So, quite often, it’s government mandates that are driving DPI investments.’

Scale, scale and scale

Whether it is for network security, traffic shaping or value-added service creation, many of the applications for DPI rely on combining fast microelectronics systems capable of processing the vast amounts of traffic that wireline and wireless networks are currently experiencing with software smart enough to make sense of the captured packets by comparing them with sophisticated data banks.
Only then can the network generate automated responses. It is what Procera calls ‘intelligent policy enforcement’.
‘We’ve been working with service provider deployments since 2001, and capacity is always a big question,’ says Linden.
Indeed, if a broadband operator is going to authorise a piece of equipment to sit in the packet path, it will face numerous questions about the product’s ability to operate transparently, without compromising network performance.
In the case of Procera, its DPI product will introduce a worst-case latency of 0.1ms, which Linden claims is a very impressive performance. But he admits: ‘We have to scale, and scale and scale to accommodate that [operators] are constantly building up their networks.’
Napatech’s Barry says his company’s DPI network adaptors, which can run at 10Gbit/s, don’t interfere at all with network performance, as the connection they are inspecting will typically be tapped: ‘It’s essentially a tap on the connection that’s providing us with a copy of everything that’s going past.’
Asked whether an ISP operating in a country where there’s government pressure to censor Internet traffic could use DPI to that end, Barry replies: ‘Of course you could. But you’ve always had that possibility anyway. I mean, you could tap telephone calls’ this is not a technology breakthrough. It’s been possible for a long time to do these sorts of things. You could have that fear, but it’s a question of trust. Do you trust that your carrier is interested in providing you with a better service?’

Further information

Mobile carriers warm up to DPI

The deep-packet-inspection market for communication service providers (there are parallel markets for the enterprise and government sectors) may be growing most noticeably in the Middle East and Asia, but it is also gaining some traction in other countries.
Analyst Shira Levine from Infonetics Research says the technology is increasingly being used by wireless carriers in North America and Western Europe. ‘Operators are less likely to want to talk about it – that’s the critical difference,’ she notes. ‘And, honestly, they’re using it for more basic traffic-management applications, not necessarily for some of the cooler applications such as value-added services.’
Part of that secretive attitude towards DPI may have started to change during the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona this February. Just before the event, DPI equipment vendor Procera Networks managed to get one of its European mobile operator customers to endorse its equipment.
Commenting on its experience using a 30Gbit/s intelligent policy enforcement appliance from Procera, Jörgen Askeroth, the chief technology officer of 3 Scandinavia, praised the product performance before adding that it was ‘business-critical to us by ensuring a positive customer experience and integration with billing’.


What Obama could of learned from Nixon about Asian Diplomacy

December 27, 2009

It isn’t only White folks who are good old boys…

Obama: “I am greatly dishonored Emperor Akihito, for owing you so much money!”

Obama didn’t get what he wanted in China because (1) Jimmy Carter is partly right (it is racism, but not American, rather Chinese racism towards Africans) (2) Obama bowed to the Japanese Emperor and that really pissed off the people we owe a lot of money to. Global Warming science might be a sham, but industrial cooperation between nations is important for other reasons. Polution is a problem that effects more then Carbon Monoxide levels. Carbon and Petroleum based burning could polute water and cause all kinds of illnesses. It is a shame that Obama couldn’t learn how to handle actual diplomacy which has nothing to do with popularity on TV and has a lot to do with how you effect people in an intimate relationship. Obama is a failure at talking man to man. For a guy who has been touting diplomacy, Obama failed to understand that real diplomacy was done by men like Richard Nixon who might of not been great mass media stars, but certainly knew how to relate to people in a small room of educated elitist minds. Only Nixon could of gone to China. We would of all been dead if they sent Obama there in the 70s.
Why did Chinese premier Wen Jiabao choose to publicly humiliate Barack Obama at Copenhagen? In their eyes, and those of much of the world, he has lost face, and with it, power and influence. While getting widespread play overseas, this story has been kept very quiet by our disinterested, nonpartisan media (I haven’t seen it mentioned in any major U.S. outlet).

After promising to meet the Messiah at 7:00 p.m., Premier Wen stiffed him in favor of a meeting with the leaders of India, South Africa, and Brazil. Rather than wait, a no-doubt infuriated Obama stalked into the room in question and demanded, “Are you ready to see me, Premier Wen?” No word on Wen’s reaction, though he did submit to a discussion on the spot that evidently sealed the release of the immortal and glorious Copenhagen Quasi-Agreement on Climate Change.

So with Barack Obama, we’ve reached the point where the leader of record of the most powerful state in history has become a man you can casually stand up. But the question remains, why?

There are a number of reasons why the Chinese might take a cavalier attitude toward an American leader. China is the chief foreign holder of American debt, which may well have created an impression of the U.S. as a beggar nation on the level of a failed African republic. (I strongly suspect that words were exchanged on this topic during Obama’s recent visit to China, though we’re unlikely ever to learn about them in detail.)

There’s also the matter of race. As is true of most Asians, the Chinese sense of racial superiority is cultural and innate. This is a people who refer to Caucasians as “ghost shadows”; what they think of American blacks is probably best not dwelt upon.

Then there’s the deep aura of unseriousness that Obama has generated around himself. Though essentially incalculable, this factor is undeniable and will grow in importance and impact as time passes.

But there’s one event in particular that very likely played a part — the fact that, only a few weeks before, Obama publicly and notoriously bowed to the emperor of Japan.

Japan and China have a lengthy history, very little of which can be termed benign. They have always been rivals, often acting at cross purposes and usually at sword’s point. But the past century of Sino-Japanese relations has been little short of horrendous.

Japan’s militarist government occupied Manchuria in 1931 and proceeded to menace the Republic of China for several years afterward. In June 1937, as a result of a contrived confrontation known as the “Marco Polo Bridge Incident”, Japan escalated to open conquest. Occupying Nanking in December of that year, the Japanese army carried out a city-wide massacre that in little more than a month resulted in over 250,000 deaths. So brutal were Japanese actions that they could not, in a pre-Auschwitz world, be referred to directly in news accounts. Sixty years passed before the story was completely told in Iris Chang’s The Rape of Nanking(Chang, a less than stable personality in the first place, was so deeply affected that she later committed suicide, after telling friends that she could not get the images of the killings out of her mind.)

For nearly a decade Japan occupied vast areas of China, a period marked by further massacres, atrocities, and casual violations of the human spirit. It’s safe to say that, but for the even viler activities of the Nazis, the Japanese occupation would stand as one of the peak moments of human cruelty in the modern era. (It’s undeniable that Japanese human experiments in their Chinese and Manchurian prison camps were fully as loathsome as those of the Nazis.)

Though the Chinese don’t discuss the matter, their attitude toward Japan and the Japanese can easily be imagined. Particularly since Japan, unlike Germany, has only in recent years reached the point of admitting to “irregularities” in its occupation, much less issuing an apology or offering reparations.

So here comes Obama, as ignorant of all this as a little lamb.

Many will recall the uproar that surrounded Ronald Reagan’s 1985 visit to a German cemetery at Bitburg, instigated by the existence of SS graves within line of sight of the ceremony. The attitude of the Chinese to Obama’s bow must be similar. From that point of view, Wen’s behavior should be taken as a rebuke, not to the United States so much as to Obama personally.

Which only goes to underline the reason why diplomatic protocol exists in the first place — to exclude through ritual actions all possibilities that error, misunderstanding, or personal pique might interfere with matters of state. Obama has yet to learn this. His insistence on winging it, on reinventing established practice on his own terms, is potentially far more than simply embarrassing. It could be actively dangerous. His refusal to go by the rules may well have cost him the opportunity to pose as Savior of Gaia in Copenhagen. It may cost him — and the country — far more at some future time.

The press is going buck wild about Obama bowing to Emperor Akihito. Make what you want of it. Some say that Obama was showing a sign of respect, others say it was totally inappropriate and it was Obama showing the weakness of the USA. But I know the truth! Obama was thanking Emeror Akihito for buying MORE US government debt. As Bloomberg reported, Japan had bought AN ADDITIONAL $105 billion dollars of US Treasuries this year, which exceeded this year’s amount of US debt that China bought. Hell, if I loaned someone $105 billion dollars, they better bow before me! Hahaha.

Check out this funny video that compares the Obama-Akihito meeting with Akihito shaking hands with politicians and royalties of other nations. Notice how the other politicians and royalties did not bow?


What Obama could of learned from Nixon about Asian Diplomacy

December 27, 2009

It isn’t only White folks who are good old boys…

Obama: “I am greatly dishonored Emperor Akihito, for owing you so much money!”

Obama didn’t get what he wanted in China because (1) Jimmy Carter is partly right (it is racism, but not American, rather Chinese racism towards Africans) (2) Obama bowed to the Japanese Emperor and that really pissed off the people we owe a lot of money to. Global Warming science might be a sham, but industrial cooperation between nations is important for other reasons. Polution is a problem that effects more then Carbon Monoxide levels. Carbon and Petroleum based burning could polute water and cause all kinds of illnesses. It is a shame that Obama couldn’t learn how to handle actual diplomacy which has nothing to do with popularity on TV and has a lot to do with how you effect people in an intimate relationship. Obama is a failure at talking man to man. For a guy who has been touting diplomacy, Obama failed to understand that real diplomacy was done by men like Richard Nixon who might of not been great mass media stars, but certainly knew how to relate to people in a small room of educated elitist minds. Only Nixon could of gone to China. We would of all been dead if they sent Obama there in the 70s.
Why did Chinese premier Wen Jiabao choose to publicly humiliate Barack Obama at Copenhagen? In their eyes, and those of much of the world, he has lost face, and with it, power and influence. While getting widespread play overseas, this story has been kept very quiet by our disinterested, nonpartisan media (I haven’t seen it mentioned in any major U.S. outlet).

After promising to meet the Messiah at 7:00 p.m., Premier Wen stiffed him in favor of a meeting with the leaders of India, South Africa, and Brazil. Rather than wait, a no-doubt infuriated Obama stalked into the room in question and demanded, “Are you ready to see me, Premier Wen?” No word on Wen’s reaction, though he did submit to a discussion on the spot that evidently sealed the release of the immortal and glorious Copenhagen Quasi-Agreement on Climate Change.

So with Barack Obama, we’ve reached the point where the leader of record of the most powerful state in history has become a man you can casually stand up. But the question remains, why?

There are a number of reasons why the Chinese might take a cavalier attitude toward an American leader. China is the chief foreign holder of American debt, which may well have created an impression of the U.S. as a beggar nation on the level of a failed African republic. (I strongly suspect that words were exchanged on this topic during Obama’s recent visit to China, though we’re unlikely ever to learn about them in detail.)

There’s also the matter of race. As is true of most Asians, the Chinese sense of racial superiority is cultural and innate. This is a people who refer to Caucasians as “ghost shadows”; what they think of American blacks is probably best not dwelt upon.

Then there’s the deep aura of unseriousness that Obama has generated around himself. Though essentially incalculable, this factor is undeniable and will grow in importance and impact as time passes.

But there’s one event in particular that very likely played a part — the fact that, only a few weeks before, Obama publicly and notoriously bowed to the emperor of Japan.

Japan and China have a lengthy history, very little of which can be termed benign. They have always been rivals, often acting at cross purposes and usually at sword’s point. But the past century of Sino-Japanese relations has been little short of horrendous.

Japan’s militarist government occupied Manchuria in 1931 and proceeded to menace the Republic of China for several years afterward. In June 1937, as a result of a contrived confrontation known as the “Marco Polo Bridge Incident”, Japan escalated to open conquest. Occupying Nanking in December of that year, the Japanese army carried out a city-wide massacre that in little more than a month resulted in over 250,000 deaths. So brutal were Japanese actions that they could not, in a pre-Auschwitz world, be referred to directly in news accounts. Sixty years passed before the story was completely told in Iris Chang’s The Rape of Nanking(Chang, a less than stable personality in the first place, was so deeply affected that she later committed suicide, after telling friends that she could not get the images of the killings out of her mind.)

For nearly a decade Japan occupied vast areas of China, a period marked by further massacres, atrocities, and casual violations of the human spirit. It’s safe to say that, but for the even viler activities of the Nazis, the Japanese occupation would stand as one of the peak moments of human cruelty in the modern era. (It’s undeniable that Japanese human experiments in their Chinese and Manchurian prison camps were fully as loathsome as those of the Nazis.)

Though the Chinese don’t discuss the matter, their attitude toward Japan and the Japanese can easily be imagined. Particularly since Japan, unlike Germany, has only in recent years reached the point of admitting to “irregularities” in its occupation, much less issuing an apology or offering reparations.

So here comes Obama, as ignorant of all this as a little lamb.

Many will recall the uproar that surrounded Ronald Reagan’s 1985 visit to a German cemetery at Bitburg, instigated by the existence of SS graves within line of sight of the ceremony. The attitude of the Chinese to Obama’s bow must be similar. From that point of view, Wen’s behavior should be taken as a rebuke, not to the United States so much as to Obama personally.

Which only goes to underline the reason why diplomatic protocol exists in the first place — to exclude through ritual actions all possibilities that error, misunderstanding, or personal pique might interfere with matters of state. Obama has yet to learn this. His insistence on winging it, on reinventing established practice on his own terms, is potentially far more than simply embarrassing. It could be actively dangerous. His refusal to go by the rules may well have cost him the opportunity to pose as Savior of Gaia in Copenhagen. It may cost him — and the country — far more at some future time.

The press is going buck wild about Obama bowing to Emperor Akihito. Make what you want of it. Some say that Obama was showing a sign of respect, others say it was totally inappropriate and it was Obama showing the weakness of the USA. But I know the truth! Obama was thanking Emeror Akihito for buying MORE US government debt. As Bloomberg reported, Japan had bought AN ADDITIONAL $105 billion dollars of US Treasuries this year, which exceeded this year’s amount of US debt that China bought. Hell, if I loaned someone $105 billion dollars, they better bow before me! Hahaha.

Check out this funny video that compares the Obama-Akihito meeting with Akihito shaking hands with politicians and royalties of other nations. Notice how the other politicians and royalties did not bow?