Hundreds of women burn their coverings in street protest against brutal Yemeni regime

October 27, 2011
(iBloga) From the Daily Mail:
Hundreds of Yemeni women have set fire to a pile of female face and body veils on a main street in the capital Sanaa to protest the government’s brutal crackdown against the country’s popular uprising.
The women spread a black cloth across a main street and threw their full-body veils, known as makrama, onto a pile, sprayed it with oil and set it ablaze. As the flames rose, they chanted: ‘Who protects Yemeni women from the crimes of the thugs?’
The women in Yemen have taken a key role in the uprising against President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s authoritarian rule that erupted in March, inspired by other Arab revolutions. 
Protesting: Yemeni women burn their veils during a demonstration demanding the resignation of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in Sanaa

Protesting: Yemeni women burn their veils during a demonstration demanding the resignation of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in Sanaa
Open dissent: The brutal Yemeni regime has fired into crowds of protesters so this rebellion is a dangerous one for the women involved

Open dissent: The brutal Yemeni regime has fired into crowds of protesters so this rebellion is a dangerous one for the women involved
Symbolic burning: The protest is a Bedouin tradition which call for help from the tribesmen as violence rages all around them

Symbolic burning: The protest is a Bedouin tradition which call for help from the tribesmen as violence rages all around them
Their role came into the limelight earlier in October, when Yemeni woman activist Tawakkul Karman was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, along with two Liberian women, for their struggle for women’s rights.
The protest, however, was not related to women’s rights or issues surrounding the Islamic veils – rather, the act of women burning their clothing is a symbolic Bedouin tribal gesture signifying an appeal for help to tribesmen, in this case to stop the attacks on the protesters.
The women who burned clothing in the capital were wearing traditional veils at the time, many covered in black from head to toe.
The protest today comes as clashes intensify between forces loyal to President Ali Abdullah Saleh and renegade fighters who have sided with the opposition in demands that the president step down.
The most recent clashes in Sanaa and elsewhere claimed 25 lives, officials said. 
Medical and local officials say up to 25 civilians, tribal fighters and government soldiers died overnight in Sanaa and the city of Taiz despite Saleh’s ceasefire announcement late on Tuesday.
Making a fist of it: An anti-government protester displays paintings on her hand of flags of other countries involved in the Arab Spring

Making a fist of it: An anti-government protester displays paintings on her hand of flags of other countries involved in the Arab Spring
Massed protest: Anti-government protesters march through the streets of Sanaa bearing banners calling for the resignation of the president

Massed protest: Anti-government protesters march through the streets of Sanaa bearing banners calling for the resignation of the president
Saleh has clung to power in the face of more than nine months of massive protests against his rule but there are signs that he may be ready to cede power.
Yesterday the president called in the U.S. ambassador, Gerald Feierstein, and told him he would sign a deal to step down, a U.S. official said.
The embattled leader has made that pledge several times before, without resolution, and the worsening violence on the streets makes it less likely that he will follow through on that pledge now.  
It was the first meeting between Saleh and a U.S. ambassador since Saleh returned from Saudi Arabia last month, said U.S. State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland.
Saleh left Yemen after an attack on his compound in early June left him badly wounded.

Evacuation: Pro-reform protesters drag wounded comrades from from the streets to a makeshift hospital near Sanaa's landmark Change Sqaure

Evacuation: Pro-reform protesters drag wounded comrades from from the streets to a makeshift hospital near Sanaa’s landmark Change Sqaure
Hoping for victory: A young girl holding a Yemeni flag makes a peace sign during a protest rally in Sanaa

Hoping for victory: A young girl holding a Yemeni flag makes a peace sign during a protest rally in Sanaa
Nine months of mass protests calling for his resignation have moved his powerful Arab neighbors, with U.S. backing, to propose a plan allowing Saleh to step down in exchange for immunity from prosecution.
That reflected a reversal for the U.S., which up to then had backed Saleh as an ally in its fight against Al Qaeda in Yemen.
Nuland said Saleh confirmed he would sign the Gulf Cooperation Council plan for him to step down – a claim he has made several times this year but which he has them backed down from at the last minute, infuriating both opponents and former allies.
Conditional: President Ali Abdullah Saleh says he will stand down if he is given immunity from prosecution

Conditional: President Ali Abdullah Saleh says he will stand down if he is given immunity from prosecution
She also said that Saleh confirmed that a cease-fire had been arranged with the opposition demonstrators, as announced on Yemen’s state news agency’s website.
On a statement on the website, Yemeni Vice President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi said that a cease-fire agreement was reached with the aim to ‘lift checkpoints, barricades and open schools… to return normal life to the capital.’
But late on Tuesday evening, troops were still firing into crowds of protesting civilians.
‘It’s not clear that that has been completely enforced on either side since then, but we do consider it a good step,’ said Nuland.
‘There is still some fighting going on.’
The protesters marched through the streets surrounding Change Square, a central crossroads where the uprising against Saleh first began in February.
‘The people want to prosecute the butcher,’ the protesters chanted, and some held posters saying that after the death of Libya’s Moammar Gaddafi, it was time for Saleh to ‘listen to your people.’
The shooting broke out between Saleh’s forces and renegade troops loyal to Major General Ali Mohsen al-Ahmar, who defected to the opposition and whose forces protect the protesters.
There have been concerns that the intensified fighting could undermine U.S. and Saudi efforts to fight Yemen’s Al Qaeda branch, considered by the U.S. to be the most dangerous of the terror network’s affiliates after it plotted two failed attacks on American soil in recent years.
Meanwhile, yesterday also saw a military plane crash before landing at the al-Ammad air base near the southern city of Aden.
Four people on board were killed and 11 injured, according to a security official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to reporters.
The official said a technical problem might have caused the crash. He said there were eight Syrians and seven Yemenis on board.

Stretcher bearers: Protesters carry an injured colleague to hospital

Stretcher bearers: Protesters carry an injured colleague to hospital

Nobel Peace Prize to Member of Terror-linked Group, No Questions Asked

October 17, 2011
anti-government rally outside Sanaa University. Photograph: Khaled Abdullah/Reuters
(by Ryan Mauro October 17, 2011 at 3:30 AM via HUDSON NY / image via Left Hand of Feminism)

On October 7, the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to three women’s rights activists, including the first Arab woman winner. Her name is Tawakul Karman; she is a member of a Muslim Brotherhood party with an Al-Qaeda-linked official as one of its senior leaders. The committee chairman acknowledged her membership and said the West’s opinion of the Muslim Brotherhood is wrong. To the committee, the Islamist ideology — complete with leaders who recommend suicide bombings and provide material support to terrorists — and peace are not mutually exclusive.
Karman is a 32-year old journalist with three children. She leads an organization called, Women Journalists Without Chains. To her credit, she has fought for women’s rights and has been imprisoned for challenging Yemeni President Saleh. She was instrumental in the Arab Spring’s manifestation in Yemen, and is an adversary of the Salafists. She wants legislation passed against child marriage. She boldly stopped wearing the niqab in 2004 and appeared on television without it.
Although these are admirable causes, the fact remains that Karman chooses to sit on the Shura Council of Islah, the Yemeni branch of the Muslim Brotherhood.
Islah was founded in 1990 and has three pillars of support: Tribes, the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafists. The Islamist party has been extremely critical of Yemen’s relationship with the U.S. and wants a religious police to “promote virtue and curb vice.” It has been revealed that Anwar al-Awlaki hid in three homes owned by Islah members before he was killed by an American drone. One home belonged to Amin al-Okaimi, the chairman of Islah. The second safehouse was owned by al-Awlaki’s driver, whose brother is a high-level Islah official. The third house was Sheikh Abdul Majid al-Zindani’s, a co-founder of Islah that can be referred to as Yemen’s version of Shiekh Yousef al-Qaradawi.
Zindani’s leadership role in Islah proves that the party is not moderate by any standard. In 2004, the U.S. Treasury Department labeled him a “specially designated terrorist” for arming, recruiting and funding for Al-Qaeda. He also has links to Ansar al-Islam, an Al-Qaeda affiliate in Iraq. A U.S. federal court said that he coordinated the bombing of the USS Cole in 2000 and a lawsuit accuses him of having personally chosen the two suicide bombers for the attack.
The university he founded in Sanaa has been indoctrinating students since its founding in 1993. John Walker Lindh, the “American Taliban” who was captured while fighting U.S. forces in Afghanistan, went to school here. Anwar al-Awlaki did as well, and even was a lecturer from 2004 to 2005. The terrorist who tried to set off a bomb in his underwear onboard a flight to Detroit, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, was also in Sanaa during this time for “education.” It has not been proven, but there is a reasonable suspicion that Abdulmutallab and al-Awlaki met at Zindani’s school.
Zindani is very close to the Muslim Brotherhood and Hamas. He is an official with the Union of Good, a network of charities overseen by Sheikh Yousef al-Qaradawi, the top Muslim Brotherhood theologian. This network is used by Hamas for fundraising. In April 2006, Zindani met with Khaled Mashall, the leader of Hamas, at a fundraiser in Yemen. Zindani urged the crowd to donate to Hamas.
Islah claims that Zindani has no connection to Al-Qaeda or terrorism at all. Even if that were true, his extremist preaching should be enough for Yemeni democratic activists to condemn him: He speaks in favor of Hamas’ suicide bombings and preaches that “an Islamic state is coming.” He is fervently anti-American, telling his followers that the “so-called war on terror is in fact a war against Islam.” It logically follows that Muslims who fight the U.S. military engaged in the war on terror are defending Islam.
Tawakul Karman’s fight for women’s rights and free elections has drawn the ire of some of her Islah colleagues. Zindani is in favor of allowing underage girls to get married to full-grown men. Some clerics in the opposition have spoken out against her. This is positive, but as Michael Rubin writes, “Karman may be honorable, but certainly it is worth asking her how she can affiliate with a party whose co-founder embraces such positions.”
She may argue that Islah is the most viable alternative to Saleh, but the opposition umbrella group to which Islah belongs is diverse. Why stick with Islah? If she feels that the other parties are no better, then why not create her own? She is a rock star in the Arab world and certainly has the following to start her own party.
The Nobel Peace Prize committee did not even begin asking these questions. In fact, the chairman even upheld the Muslim Brotherhood as a positive force. Norwegian Nobel Committee chairman Thorbjoern Jagland said that the group knew about her Muslim Brotherhood ties, acknowledging that “in the West [it] is perceived as a threat to democracy.” To him, her Brotherhood affiliation was far from a disqualifier. He said the West is wrong to fear the group. “I don’t believe that [the West’s view]. There are many signals that, that kind of movement can be an important part of the solution.”
The Nobel Peace Prize committee is supposed to recognize those who fight for human rights, justice, peace and good-will. Instead, it has honored a prominent member of a Muslim Brotherhood party that has an Al-Qaeda-linked preacher of hate among its leadership. The Nobel Peace Prize committee has lost whatever credibility it had left.

She shows no sign of reform beyond her twat, which is fine… but hardly worthy of praise.


Another "Day of Rage", in Yemen

July 17, 2011


Masked women participate in a demonstration to demand the ouster of Yemen’s President Ali Abdullah Saleh in the southern city of Taiz July 17, 2011. (Reuters Pictures)A contingent of female Yemeni pirates, brandishing skull and cross bones and the ever present portrait of the psychotic mass murderer Che Guevara (seen below on the left), were there.
Women march during a demonstration to demand the ouster of Yemen’s President Ali Abdullah Saleh in the southern city of Taiz July 17, 2011. (Reuters Pictures)(AFP) Tens of thousands of Yemenis marched through the country’s second city Taez on Sunday in what they called a “day of rage” against President Ali Abdallah Saleh on the anniversary of his rise to power in 1978.
Demonstrators assembled on Taez’s main arterial road, chanting anti-Saleh slogans and waving black flags to mourn the embattled president’s 33-year rule, the rally’s organisers said.
Protesters called for the resignation of Saleh, who has been in Saudi Arabia for the past six weeks receiving treatment for wounds sustained in a June 3 bomb blast at his presidential compound in Sanaa.
Three soldiers and seven civilians were killed in Taez on Friday as supporters of the regime clashed with its opponents, leaving at least 37 other Yemenis injured.
More… via Eye-On-The-World


Ex-CIA chief: Kadhafi was good partner

April 28, 2011

…The former chief of the CIA on Tuesday praised Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi’s past cooperation and said his downfall could complicate US interests in the short term. Retired general Michael Hayden, who led the Central Intelligence Agency from 2006 to 2009 under president George W. Bush, said that restive Syria also helped US intelligence but only in selective areas. Speaking at a conference of the Marine Corps University, Hayden said the CIA had worked well with Kadhafi and Mussa Kussa, the foreign minister who defected last month as Libyan forces moved against rebels.

Former CIA director Michael Hayden:
NATIONAL HARBOR, Maryland

“Whatever you think of Kadhafi and Mussa Kussa… they were good and they were good counter-terrorism partners,” Hayden told the conference near Washington. Hayden said Syrian President Bashar al-Assad was “pretty good” at fighting Sunni Muslim militants but supported Shiite radicals. Assad belongs to the Alawite sect, a Shiite offshoot despised by Sunni extremists such as Al-Qaeda. “In both cases, you have real near-term turbulence that could — that will — make the closer fight in the immediate time-frame much more difficult,” Hayden said. But Hayden said the wave of unrest across the Arab world could prove beneficial to the United States in the long term by changing the dynamics of the region. The uprisings “will make the ground far less fertile for the type of extremism that Al-Qaeda proselytizes, but it’s a long time between here and there,” Hayden said. Kadhafi, a longtime international pariah due to the 1988 Lockerbie bombing and other attacks blamed on Libyan spies, started to reconcile with the United States in 2003 and found common interests in fighting Al-Qaeda. But Western powers led by France and Britain launched air strikes on Kadhafi’s forces last month due to fears of mass civilian casualties as they mobilized against rebel strongholds. Syria, meanwhile, on Tuesday bolstered troops around the flashpoint town of Daraa, triggering calls for a foreign intervention. A Syrian rights group said the crackdown has killed 400 people since mid-March. Hayden also voiced concern about Yemen, a frontline in the US-backed campaign against Al-Qaeda. President Ali Abdullah Saleh, a key US partner who has been in power for 30 years, has agreed to a plan to step down. “I would never claim that President Saleh was, kind of, an easy fit as a partner with regard to anything. But I don’t know what’s on the next page,” Hayden said. “Now you’ve got the Yemeni government at best distracted and perhaps worse,” he said. via google.com

so why are win in Syria and not Libya? Because Obama’s idea is to impress the Muslim world and not score victories for Israel.

Yemen: Army storms university, wounding 98

March 9, 2011

Protesters carry a poster of late president of former North Yemen Ibrahim al-Hamdi as they shout slogans during a rally to demand the ouster of Yemen’s President Ali Abdullah Saleh outside Sanaa University March 8, 2011. Yemeni protests demanding an end to Saleh’s 32-year rule spread to a tribal area considered his political stronghold on Tuesday, and military vehicles deployed in the capital. (Reuters Pictures)

SANAA, Yemen (AP) – The Yemeni government escalated its efforts to stop mass protests calling for the president’s ouster on Tuesday, with soldiers firing rubber bullets and tear gas at students camped at a university in the capital in a raid that left at least 98 people wounded, officials said.
The army stormed the Sanaa University campus hours after thousands of inmates rioted at the central prison in the capital, taking a dozen guards hostage and calling for President Ali Abdullah Saleh to step down. At least one prisoner was killed and 80 people were wounded as the guards fought to control the situation, police said. […]
Medical officials said many of the 98 people wounded were in serious condition. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to release the information. Witnesses reported seeing armored vehicles and personnel carriers headed to the area of the university.
“It’s a massacre,” said opposition spokesman Muhammad Qahtan. “It is a crime by security troops against students engaged in a peaceful sit-in.”
Demonstrations also continued elsewhere in the country. In the southern port city of Aden, a crowd of women joined a demonstration after a young protester was shot in the head and critically wounded during a rally there the previous day.
Tens of thousands took to the streets in the Ibb province, calling on the government to bring to justice those responsible for a deadly attack there Sunday. Opposition activists blamed “government thugs” who descended on protesters camped out on a main square. One person was killed in that violence and 53 people were hurt.
More…

here it comes