Obama recess appointment at US Trade Rep founded US Brotherhood umbrella group

September 9, 2013
(Ambassador Islam Siddiqui)

The thing that gets me about these Jihadists is how smart they are. We are the idiots.

[Creeping Sharia] missed this appointment back in 2009 but he’s in the news now. via Obama’s secret war on Colombia.
I began to investigate the reasons why the Free Trade Agreement negotiated by the Obama Administration was being implicated as the reason for the ICA ‘s Resolution 9.70. I found part of the answer in an article published by the Washington Fair Trade Organization titled, Monsanto Writes US Trade Deals (really) The article pointed to Islam A. Siddiqui, Chief Agricultural Negotiator as evidence that Monsanto writes the Obama Administration’s Free Trade Agreements.
Who is Islam A. Siddiqui?
According to his bio on the government website he serves as Chief Agricultural Negotiator with the rank of ambassador at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. He is responsible for bilateral and multilateral negotiations and policy coordination regarding agricultural trade. Just prior to his appointment he served as Vice President for Science and Regulatory Affairs at CropLife America. From 2001 to 2008, Siddiqui was a registered lobbyist with CropLife America, representing biotechnology companies including Monsanto,BASF, Bayer CropScience, Dow AgroSciences, DuPont, FMC Corp, Sumitomo, and Syngenta.
Obama’s appointment of Islam Siddiqui in 2010 was extremely controversial. According to Organic Consumers Association in their article 98 Organizations Oppose Obama’s Monsanto Man . The article lists the organizations that wanted to block the nomination. Included is details of Siddiqui ‘s involvement with CropLife America. They also cover his long history of support for conventional pesticide laden farming, and GMO foods. The appointment went through and is proof of another broken promise. During Obama’s 2008 campaign he said that “lobbyists won’t find a job in my White House.”
From the link to Siddiqui’s bio above:
Ambassador Islam Siddiqui, Chief Agricultural Negotiator
Islam A. Siddiqui serves as Chief Agricultural Negotiator with the rank of ambassador at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. He is responsible for bilateral and multilateral negotiations and policy coordination regarding agricultural trade.
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Dr. Siddiqui most recently served as Vice President for Science and Regulatory Affairs at CropLife America, where he was responsible for regulatory and international trade issues related to crop protection chemicals. Previously, he has also served as Vice President for Agricultural Biotechnology and Trade at CropLife America.
From 2004 to 2009, Dr. Siddiqui served on the Industry Trade Advisory Committee on Chemicals, Pharmaceuticals, and Health/Science Products & Services at the U.S. Department of Commerce where he advised the U.S. Secretary of Commerce and USTR on international trade issues related to these sectors.
In 2001, Dr. Siddiqui was appointed Senior Associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), where he focused on agricultural biotechnology and food security issues.
He served the Clinton Administration in several capacities from 1997-2001: at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Dr. Siddiqui was Undersecretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs; Senior Trade Advisor to Secretary Dan Glickman; and Deputy Undersecretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs. As a result, he worked closely with the USTR and represented USDA in bilateral, regional and multi-lateral agricultural trade negotiations. Before joining USDA, Dr. Siddiqui spent 28 years with the California Department of Food and Agriculture.
Dr. Siddiqui earned M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in plant pathology, both from theUniversity of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. His B.S. degree in plant protection is from Uttar Pradesh Agricultural University in Pantnagar, India.
Office of the United States Trade Representative   •   http://www.ustr.gov/   •   accessed on: Wed, 19 Jun 2013 23:52:06 -0400
Who is he? All we know is he worked for Clinton and was appointed to a top role by Barrack Hussein Obama despite significant opposition. Although we don’t know when, he did attend the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, where, according to researchers, the Muslim Brotherhood established its foothold in the US:
The Muslim Students Association of the United States and Canada, or MSA (also known as MSA National), was established mainly by members of the Muslim Brotherhood (MB) in January 1963 at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Nyack College theologian Larry A. Poston writes that “many of the founding members of this agency [MSA] were members of, or had connections to,” the Muslim Brotherhood or Jamaat-i-Islami.
The creation of MSA resulted from Saudi-backed efforts to establish Islamic organizations internationally in the 1960s, for the purpose of spreading its Wahhabist ideology across the globe.
Further research finds that this Obama recess appointment founded a Muslim Brotherhood umbrella group, the United Muslims of America (UMA):
Dr. Islam Siddiqui, founder and past president of UMA, is currently serving as Chief Agricultural Negotiator with the rank of ambassador at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. He is responsible for bilateral and multilateral negotiations and policy coordination regarding agricultural trade. Before this he served as Vice President, Science and Regulatory Affairs, for Crop Life America. Earlier, he served as Under Secretary of Agriculture under President Clinton, and spent 28 years in various positions with the California Department of Food and Agriculture including the Directorship of the Division of Plant Industry.
UMA is a member of American Muslim Taskforce on Civil Rights and Elections (AMT). AMT is comprised of the following organizations:
Muslim Brotherhood documents, and other sources, identify many of these same groups, and at least one of the groups above confirmed.
mb-orgs
mb-orgsmb-orgs2
Carry on.

USDA Alert: Half of U.S. Counties Designated Primary Disaster Areas, Financial Fallout “Intensifying” “Beef is simply going to be too expensive to eat".

August 2, 2012

USDA Alert: Half of U.S. Counties Designated Primary Disaster Areas, Financial Fallout “Intensifying” “Beef is simply going to be too expensive to eat”.(SHTF).By Marc Slavo.The largest natural disaster in American history just went from bad to worse.
Sweltering heat and persistent drought across the country has ravaged crops to such extremes this summer that tens of thousands of farmers and ranchers are on the verge of financial ruin. The situation is so dire that it has prompted the US Department of Agriculture to declare more than half of America a disaster area.

…more than half of all U.S. counties – 1,584 in 32 states – have been designated primary disaster areas this growing season, the vast majority of them mired in a drought that’s considered the worst in decades.
Counties in Arkansas, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Mississippi, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee and Wyoming were included in Wednesday’s announcement. The USDA uses the weekly U.S. Drought Monitor to help decide which counties to deem disaster areas, which makes farmers and ranchers eligible for federal aid, including low-interest emergency loans.
Source: Seattle Times

Without the ability to harvest their crops, many farmers are finding it difficult to make good on loans they used to fund their operations. Cattle ranchers, who can’t find hay due to the drought and whose feed prices are skyrocketing, are also feeling the pinch.
An AgWeb discussion in early July involving small business and family farmers displayed their desperation, with many commentors indicating this summer’s drought is the worst they’ve ever experienced. Others reported their crops were dying and pleaded for rain.
That rain never came, and according to industry experts and officials at the USDA, conditions are now set to intensify and worsen.

As of this week, nearly half of the nation’s corn crop was rated poor to very poor, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. About 37 percent of the U.S. soybeans were lumped into that category, while nearly three-quarters of U.S. cattle acreage is in drought-affected areas, the survey showed.
The potential financial fallout in the nation’s midsection appears to be intensifying. The latest weekly Mid-America Business Conditions Index, released Wednesday, showed that the ongoing drought and global economic turmoil is hurting business in nine Midwest and Plains states, boosting worries about the prospect of another recession, according to the report.
Creighton University economist Ernie Goss, who oversees the index, said the drought will hurt farm income while the strengthening dollar hinders exports, meaning two of the most important positive factors in the region’s economy are being undermined.

Food supplies across the country – for animals and humans – are literally drying up.
This will undoubtedly lead to significant food price increases across the entire spectrum of the American diet – meat, grain, dairy, vegetables and fruit.


Tom Chatham of Project Chesapeake writes:

Corn and soybean meal are staples in animal feed and the rising prices and drought conditions are forcing farmers and ranchers to sell off their herds for slaughter. This will cause a glut in the market over the short term and you may see lower meat prices as a result but this will only be temporary. By next year the prices of meat will rise as the supply of livestock reaches multi decade lows. Supply and demand will push prices higher as a result.

Larry Pope, chief executive of Smithfield Foods has recently given a dire warning. “Beef is simply going to be too expensive to eat. Pork is not going to be too far behind. Chicken is catching up fast.” 

He also stated that government regulations are going to make things even worse. Almost 40% of the U.S corn crop goes to make ethanol fuel. Pope said, “Its almost a government- mandated disaster here, which is distressing”.
He warned that meat prices will rise by “significant double digits“.

For those with the ability to do so, we recommend putting away foods that your family eats regularly, and planning for at least a three to six month window of upward price pressure. Tess Pennington offers some drought preparedness tips:

The price increases will be dramatic. Expect to see fewer grocery store sales, especially those great “loss leaders” we all love to take advantage of.
Prepare for this by stocking up NOW before the major price increases hit. For instance, purchasing bulk dried corn, corn meal, and a diverse supply of bulk meats before the prices rise. Pamper your garden and get every single ounce of produce you can squeeze out of it. Buy in bulk to take advantage of lower prices and preserve food for use this winter.
Make adjustments in your shopping and eating habits now to weather the upcoming food crisis.

If you’ve got a freezer, load it up with as much meat as you can afford to buy. Package dry goods for the long-term and have a steady supply of beans, wheat (or flour), corn and rice on hand to dip into if prices do happen to jump. While we all hope for a rainy year in 2013 to get struggling farmers back on their feet and our prices at the grocery stores to affordable levels, taking measures today based on the credible information available to us can help save us from paying 30% or more in food costs over the course of the next several months.
While the idea of buying commodities at lower prices today may save us money, worst case scenario planning is always in order. A well stocked food pantry can help us supplement our diets for quite some time if we experience a drought similar to the Dust Bowl of the 1930′s, which was felt for three consecutive and particularly devastating years before things began to return to normal.Read the full story here.

it’s hard to imagine America having a shortage of meat


5 Million Farmers Sue Monsanto for $7.7 Billion.

June 5, 2012

(other)5 Million Farmers Sue Monsanto for $7.7 Billion.(By Anthony Gucciardi) Launching a lawsuit against the very company that is responsible for a farmer suicide every 30 minutes, 5 million farmers are now suing Monsanto for as much as 6.2 billion euros (around 7.7 billion US dollars). The reason? As with many other cases, such as the ones that led certain farming regions to be known as the ‘suicide belt’, Monsanto has been reportedly taxing the farmers to financial shambles with ridiculous royalty charges. The farmers state that Monsanto has been unfairly gathering exorbitant profits each year on a global scale from “renewal” seed harvests, which are crops planted using seed from the previous year’s harvest.
The practice of using renewal seeds dates back to ancient times, but Monsanto seeks to collect massive royalties and put an end to the practice. Why? Because Monsanto owns the very patent to the genetically modified seed, and is charging the farmers not only for the original crops, but the later harvests as well. Eventually, the royalties compound and many farmers begin to struggle with even keeping their farm afloat. It is for this reason that India slammed Monsanto with groundbreaking ‘biopiracy’ charges in an effort to stop Monsanto from ‘patenting life’.
Jane Berwanger, a lawyer for the farmers who went on record regarding the case, told the Associated Press:
“Monsanto gets paid when it sell the seeds. The law gives producers the right to multiply the seeds they buy and nowhere in the world is there a requirement to pay (again). Producers are in effect paying a private tax on production.”
The findings echo what thousands of farmers have experienced in particularly poor nations, where many of the farmers are unable to stand up to Monsanto. Back in 2008, the Daily Mail covered what is known as the ‘GM Genocide’, which is responsible for taking the lives of over 17,683 Indian farmers in 2009 alone. After finding that their harvests were failing and they began to enter economic turmoil, the farmers began ending their own lives — oftentimes drinking the very same insecticide that Monsanto provided them with.
As the information continues to surface on Monsanto’s crimes, further lawsuits will begin to take effect. After it was ousted in January that Monsanto was running illegal ‘slave-like’ working rings, more individuals became aware of just how seriously Monsanto seems to disregard their workers — so why would they care for the health of their consumers? In April, another group of farmers sued Monsanto for ‘knowingly poisoning’ workers and causing ‘devastating birth defects’.
Will endless lawsuits from millions of seriously affected individuals will be the end of Monsanto?Read the full story here.

awful


"Israelis turn Holy Land into economic miracle"

November 22, 2011

(EOZ) Here’s a great article from the Times (South Africa) a week ago that slipped under the radar:

JUST 20% of Israel is arable. Yet, since its independence in May 1948, the country’s agricultural output has increased 16-fold, many times the rate of population growth. This is down to a lot of perspiration and, more importantly, a large dollop of innovation and cooperation.
This is nothing new. Close to the Desert Plant Research Station in Be’er Sheva is a farm cultivated by the Nabateans, the earliest desert farmers. Using sophisticated terracing, every drop of runoff water was collected and diverted to the fields and orchards.
Fast-forward 2000 years, and today Israel produces over two-thirds of its food requirements. Agriculture exports are worth more than $2-billion, more than half of which is fresh produce.
No one needs reminding that Israel’s external image is dominated by pictures of conflict and perceptions of injustice. Lost in this portrayal is how smart Israel has been in developing its economy.
In agriculture, for example, it has used technology to reduce water usage and increase output, and higher-yield crops to increase both volumes and financial sales values. Drip and direct-feed computerised irrigation systems are the norm.
It’s a far cry from 1948, when no one gave the newly independent Jewish state much of a chance.
Despite rapid population growth (now over 7.5 million), Israelis enjoy a per-capita income today of $29600, putting them in the top 30 world-wide, between Spain and Italy.
Although it depends on imports for nearly all of its raw materials, from oil to diamonds, Israel has become a global industrial hub. It is a world leader in diamond polishing and cutting, processed foods, electronic and medical equipment, and, more recently, software, semi-conductors and telecommunications. After the US, it has more companies listed on the Nasdaq than any other country.
There is no single explanation for Israel’s success, although high on the list is surely its commitment to research and development. Its detractors, however, routinely cite US assistance as the main reason for its success. Much of the $3-billion it receives annually from Washington is spent on military kit, rather than development.
That said, there can be no doubt that the military dimension has proved vital in Israel’s overall development picture, especially in so far as the mindset it engendered of robust accountability across society, long-term thinking and a problem-solving ethos.
To translate ideas into business ventures, Israel has fostered a system that encourages and caters for entrepreneurship. It has established a “cluster” of universities in close proximity to large and small companies, creating a virtuous space for suppliers, talent and capital. The government provides $450-million in annual grants to 1200 worthy projects from 2000 applications.
Like everything else in the Holy Land, assessing why Israel has done so well in economic terms – and certainly by comparison to its neighbours – is shaped by one’s view of the region’s politics, ancient and contemporary.
Many have incentives to play down Israel’s achievements and use it as both a scapegoat and a whipping boy for the failings of others. And with nearly half the West Bank’s and 80% of Gaza’s population under the poverty line, the conditions don’t only exist for deprivation, unemployment and radicalisation, but grist for Israel’s opponents.
Israel still faces serious economic challenges, not least the over-concentration of wealth in the hands of a few “tycoons”, the 15 or so families that control conglomerates dominating the economy.
Nevertheless, Israel’s example of “performance through adversity” contains numerous lessons for developing countries that shouldn’t be ignored. Contrary to the highly politicised caricatures of Israel as a US protectorate milking the Holocaust for all it is worth, nearly all its achievements stem from the firm conviction that their fate is not someone else’s responsibility.
Developing countries would do well to emulate, rather than bash, Israel.

The full paper is here (h/t Brad)