#GunControl? 3D Printer Projects – #Gun Parts – AR Bullet Magazine

February 16, 2013
Gun PartsDefDist has created a 3D-printed 30-round AR magazine, ExtremeTech reported. The magazine was printed out on an Objet Connex26 using transparent VeroClear printing material in order to show the magazine’s round count and feeding action. DefDist noted that the final printed product wasn’t perfect, as “practically every component” had to be shaved at least once. The team managed one trial that shot about five rounds before failure — not so bad for a first run.(Image)(pcmag.com)
of course we will be told that gun control is something that will be enforceable… the bad guys wouldn’t download anything from the internet… would they?

Nokia backs 3DPrinting for mobile phone cases

January 20, 2013

Nokia Lumia phonesThe design files will let people produce their own cases for their Lumia 820

(I can’t wait to have a cellular phone connected to my 3D printed gun! Give the world a serial killer reality show)

Nokia is releasing design files that will let owners use 3D printers to make their own cases for its Lumia phones Files containing mechanical drawings, case measurements and recommended materials have already been released by the phone maker. Those using the files will be able to create a custom-designed case for the flagship Lumia 820 handset. The project makes Nokia one of the first big electronics firms to seriously back 3D printing. In a blogpost, John Kneeland, one of Nokia’s community managers, revealed the Finnish phone maker’s decision to release the 3D drawings. Printing in 3D involves sending a design file to a printer that then forms a solid version of that object by slowly building it up in layers of plastic. Early 3D printers could only work in one colour but the latest versions can produce intricate, multicoloured objects. Industrial sequel Mr Kneeland said Nokia was releasing what he called a “3D printing development kit” to help people produce the cases. The files are already available on the site Nokia maintains for its developers. He said 3D printing was another way that the firm wanted to build links to that vast community of software and hardware engineers. To get the files, users must have registered with Nokia. He said Nokia already used 3D printing internally to do rapid prototyping, but decided to back it more publicly to help the nascent technology realise its “incredible potential”. In the future, he said, 3D printing was likely to bring about phones that were “wildly more modular and customisable”. Nokia might just end up selling a phone template, he said, allowing entrepreneurs to use that to produce handsets that satisfy the particular needs of their locale. “You want a waterproof, glow-in-the-dark phone with a bottle-opener and a solar charger? Someone can build it for you – or you can print it yourself,” he wrote. He added that, in his view, 3D printing was a technology that justified its hype and said it was “the sequel to the Industrial Revolution”. “However, it’s going to take somewhat longer to arrive than some people anticipate, and that may disappoint people,” he said.


3D Printing of a Gun. How can you have gun control if you can download your gun like music?

January 1, 2013

– The 3-D Printed Handgun –

Here is what gets to the heart of the argument. my father brought up technology. what happens with 3d printers? Will the government be able to stop the transfer of a blue print of a gun over the internet any better then they can stop the transfer of music and video.
And then there’s Defense Distributed, a.k.a. the Wiki Weapon Project, the initiative cooked up by a University of Texas Law student and some of his buddies to 3-D print a working firearm. The group’s Indiegogo funding campaign was shut down in the early going and 3-D printer maker Stratasys revoked the lease on Wiki Weapon’s fabricator at one point, but through Bitcoin and other technology providers they’ve managed to keep the project alive and funded.

Last we saw the Defense Distributed boys out on the range, they were firing an AR-15 rifle with a 3-D printed lower receiver–not of their own design, but one that is already available out there on the Web. They managed to get six rounds off before the plastic component broke, but they learned a bit about recoil and stress as they pertain to 3-D printed plastic in the process. These guys seem pretty serious about bringing their own, freely distributed, publicly available printable firearm design into being relatively soon, which could make 2013 an interesting year in terms of ethics and legal infrastructure that are scrambling to keep up with accelerating 3-D fabrication technologies.